Browsing by Subject "Souterrains"

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Browsing by Subject "Souterrains"

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  • McCarthy, J. P. (Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 1975)
    This site was first discovered when the weight of a mechanical digger overhead caused the roof of the main chamber to collapse. This was in November 1975 and it was first reported in the Cork Examiner where it was described ...
  • McCarthy, J. P. (Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 1978)
    A brief account of the two axes to be described and illustrated here was published by Power in 1926. He states that they were discovered at Aghadown near Baltimore, in a souterrain locally known as Poll-a-Talmhain
  • McCarthy, J. P. (Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 1978)
    A souterrain was discovered here when the weight of a tractor passing overhead caused a collapse of the roof of Chamber I. It was surveyed in March 1976. The landowner, Mr. Thomas Curran of Ballylangdon has consented to ...
  • McCarthy, J. P. (Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 1983)
    There are several thousand souterrains in Ireland, and in Co. Cork to date we have records of the existence of approximately 500. The scientific name souterrain is an antiquarian's term for these monuments. Other names ...
  • McCarthy, J. P. (Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, 2003)
    The townland of Dunisky (Dún Uisce, 'water fort', see Ó Murchadha 2001, 98) is situated about 2.5 miles to the SE of Macroom, Co. Cork (Ill. 1). It is also the Civil Parish of Dunisky, and is located in the Barony of West ...