"Maybe that's what happens if you touch the Doctor, even for a second": Trauma in Doctor Who

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dc.contributor.author Gibbs, Alan
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-22T09:28:49Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-22T09:28:49Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10-23
dc.identifier.citation Gibbs, A. (2013) '"Maybe that's what happens if you touch the Doctor, even for a second": Trauma in Doctor Who', Journal of Popular Culture, 46(5), pp. 950-972. doi: 10.1111/jpcu.12062 en
dc.identifier.volume 46 en
dc.identifier.issued 5 en
dc.identifier.startpage 950 en
dc.identifier.endpage 972 en
dc.identifier.issn 0022-3840
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10016
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/jpcu.12062 en
dc.description.abstract When the BBC television series Doctor Who returned in 2005, this followed an absence of 16 years (barring the 1996 TV movie starring Paul McGann). During this hiatus theories associated with trauma were widely disseminated in the West. Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was first defined in 1980 by the American Psychiatric Association (APA), the term’s preeminence was in its infancy at the time of the cancellation of the original run of Doctor Who in 1989. In the 1963-1989 series direct treatment of trauma was thus sparse and unsystematic, whereas in the more theoretically-aware period of 2005 to the present day, the new series has engaged extensively and self-consciously with theories of trauma. The following essay analyses both series’ approach to issues of trauma with a two-fold intention. Firstly, to highlight the different approaches taken to trauma in the series’ two runs: the more metaphorical and piecemeal approach in the original, compared to the way in which the current series has drawn more directly and systematically on existing theory, to the extent that trauma has become a crucial concept underpinning its popular success. Secondly, the essay analyses ways in which an academic discourse such as trauma studies is articulated in and disseminated through the realm of popular culture. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. en
dc.rights © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Gibbs, A. (2013) '"Maybe that's what happens if you touch the Doctor, even for a second": Trauma in Doctor Who', Journal of Popular Culture, 46(5), pp. 950-972, doi: 10.1111/jpcu.12062, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jpcu.12062. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. en
dc.subject Trauma en
dc.subject Doctor Who en
dc.subject PTSD en
dc.subject Popular culture en
dc.title "Maybe that's what happens if you touch the Doctor, even for a second": Trauma in Doctor Who en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Alan Gibbs, English, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: a.gibbs@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2020-05-19T13:44:36Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 240355061
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Popular Culture en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.gibbs@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.eissn 1540-5931


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