Cardiorespiratory hysteresis during incremental high altitude ascent-descent quantifies the magnitude of ventilatory acclimatization

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dc.contributor.author Leacy, Jack K.
dc.contributor.author Linares, Andrea M.
dc.contributor.author Zouboules, Shaelynn M.
dc.contributor.author Rampuri, Zahrah H.
dc.contributor.author Bird, Jordan D.
dc.contributor.author Herrington, Brittney A.
dc.contributor.author Mann, Leah M.
dc.contributor.author Soriano, Jan E.
dc.contributor.author Thrall, Scott F.
dc.contributor.author Kalker, Anne
dc.contributor.author Brutsaert, Tom D.
dc.contributor.author O'Halloran, Ken D.
dc.contributor.author Sherpa, Mingma T.
dc.contributor.author Day, Trevor A.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-26T08:48:06Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-26T08:48:06Z
dc.date.issued 2020-05-18
dc.identifier.citation Leacy, J. K., Linares, A. M., Zouboules, S. M., Rampuri, Z. H., Bird, J. D., Herrington, B. A., Mann, L. M., Soriano, J. E., Thrall, S. F., Kalker, A. and Brutsaert, T. D. (2020) 'Cardiorespiratory hysteresis during incremental high altitude ascent‐descent quantifies the magnitude of ventilatory acclimatization', Experimental Physiology. doi: 10.1113/EP088488 en
dc.identifier.issn 0958-0670
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10047
dc.identifier.doi 10.1113/EP088488 en
dc.description.abstract Maintenance of arterial blood gases is achieved through sophisticated regulation of ventilation, mediated by central and peripheral chemoreflexes. Respiratory chemoreflexes are important during exposure to high altitude due to the competing influence of hypoxia and hypoxic hyperventilation‐mediated hypocapnia on steady‐state ventilatory drive. Inter‐individual variability exists in ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude, potentially affecting the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). We aimed to quantify ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude by comparing differential ascent and descent values (i.e. hysteresis) in steady‐state cardiorespiratory variables. We hypothesized that (a) the hysteresis area formed by cardiorespiratory variables during ascent and descent would quantify the magnitude of ventilatory acclimatization, and (b) larger hysteresis areas would be associated with lower AMS symptom scores during ascent. In 25 healthy, Diamox‐free trekkers ascending to and descending from 5160 m, cardiorespiratory hysteresis was measured in the pressure of end‐tidal (PET)CO2, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), minute ventilation (V̇E), chemoreceptor stimulus index (SI; PETCO2/SpO2) and the calculated steady‐state chemoreflex drive (SS‐CD; V̇E/SI) using portable devices (capnograph, peripheral pulse oximeter and respirometer, respectively). AMS symptoms were assessed daily using the Lake Louise Questionnaire. We found that (a) ascent‐descent hysteresis was present in all cardiorespiratory variables, (b) SS‐CD is a valid metric for tracking ventilatory acclimatization to high altitude and (c) highest AMS scores during ascent were significantly, moderately and inversely‐correlated to SS‐CD hysteresis magnitude (rs = ‐0.408, P = 0.043). We propose that ascent‐descent hysteresis is a novel and feasible way to quantify ventilatory acclimatization in trekkers during high altitude exposure. en
dc.description.sponsorship Government of Alberta (Student Temporary Employment Program); Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (Undergraduate Research Student Assistantship; Discovery grant RGPIN-2016-04915); en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. on behalf of the Physiological Society en
dc.rights © 2020, the Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2020 The Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Leacy, J. K., Linares, A. M., Zouboules, S. M., Rampuri, Z. H., Bird, J. D., Herrington, B. A., Mann, L. M., Soriano, J. E., Thrall, S. F., Kalker, A. and Brutsaert, T. D. (2020) 'Cardiorespiratory hysteresis during incremental high altitude ascent‐descent quantifies the magnitude of ventilatory acclimatization', Experimental Physiology, doi: 10.1113/EP088488, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1113/EP088488. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. en
dc.subject Acute mountain sickness en
dc.subject High altitude en
dc.subject Hypoxia en
dc.subject Respiratory chemoreflexes en
dc.subject Ventilatory acclimatization en
dc.title Cardiorespiratory hysteresis during incremental high altitude ascent-descent quantifies the magnitude of ventilatory acclimatization en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Ken O'Halloran, Physiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.ohalloran@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-05-18
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.contributor.funder Government of Alberta en
dc.contributor.funder Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Experimental Physiology en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.ohalloran@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check volume / issue / page range. Amend citation and copyright statement accordingly. en
dc.identifier.eissn 1469-445X


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