The inherent jurisdiction of the Irish High Court: Interface with psychiatry

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dc.contributor.author Gulati, Gautam
dc.contributor.author Whelan, Darius
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Valerie
dc.contributor.author Dunne, Colum P.
dc.contributor.author Kelly, Brendan D.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-05-26T10:14:28Z
dc.date.available 2020-05-26T10:14:28Z
dc.date.issued 2020-02-01
dc.identifier.citation Gulati G., Whelan D., Murphy V., Dunne C. P. and Kelly B. D. (2020) 'The inherent jurisdiction of the Irish High Court: Interface with psychiatry', International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 69, 101533 (4 pp). doi: 10.1016/j.ijlp.2019.101533 en
dc.identifier.volume 69 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 4 en
dc.identifier.issn 0160-2527
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10053
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.ijlp.2019.101533 en
dc.description.abstract The term “inherent jurisdiction” refers to a set of default powers, usually not set out in statute, which enables a court to fulfil its roles. We discuss recently reported cases where such power has been exercised by the Irish High Court and what this means for psychiatrists in practice. These cases demonstrate that (a) the Irish High Court can be involved in decision-making where there is a lacuna in mental health legislation and a lack of mental capacity; (b) when a minor has been placed by the Court in a specialist facility in the UK and then attains the age of 18 years, decisions can be based on mental capacity but not on preventative detention on the basis of risk; (c) complexities arise when definitions of mental disorder vary between jurisdictions, especially when the Court orders involuntary detention in a case where statute would not ordinarily allow this; and (d) the appropriate route to seek decision-making for adults with mental incapacity is through Ireland's “Ward of Court” process, although, on the face of it, this seems to be contrary to the approach taken in other cases in which inherent jurisdiction was used. Overall, while it is reassuring for state health services that they can seek to approach higher courts in respect of decision-making in complex cases, some of these decisions raise important ethical questions for psychiatrists who may be asked to treat patients detained under their care who may not have a treatable mental illness as their condition falls outside of mental disorder within Irish legislation. We recommend that clear guidance is made available to psychiatrists in light of these judgments, particularly as there is likely to be a reconsideration of cases where Irish patients are placed in the UK given the UK's planned departure from the EU. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.uri https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160252719301931
dc.rights © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject High Court en
dc.subject Inherent Jurisdiction en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.subject Irish en
dc.subject Mental Health en
dc.subject Psychiatry en
dc.title The inherent jurisdiction of the Irish High Court: Interface with psychiatry en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Darius Whelan, School Of Law, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: d.whelan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-02-01
dc.date.updated 2020-05-18T08:56:01Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 502034615
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle International Journal of Law and Psychiatry en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress d.whelan@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 101533 en


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© 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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