Enhancing the stress responses of probiotics for a lifestyle from gut to product and back again

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dc.contributor.author Mills, S.
dc.contributor.author Stanton, Catherine
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Gerald F.
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2013-04-08T15:37:10Z
dc.date.available 2013-04-08T15:37:10Z
dc.date.copyright 2011-08
dc.date.issued 2011-08
dc.identifier.citation Mills, S., Stanton, C., Fitzgerald, G. F. and Ross, R.P. (2011) Enhancing the Stress Responses of Probiotics for a Lifestyle from Gut to Product and Back Again. Microbial Cell Factories 10(Suppl 1):S19 en
dc.identifier.volume 10 en
dc.identifier.issued (Suppl 1):S19 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1031
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1475-2859-10-S1-S19
dc.description.abstract Before a probiotic bacterium can even begin to fulfill its biological role, it must survive a battery of environmental stresses imposed during food processing and passage through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Food processing stresses include extremes in temperature, as well as osmotic, oxidative and food matrix stresses. Passage through the GIT is a hazardous journey for any bacteria with deleterious lows in pH encountered in the stomach to the detergent-like properties of bile in the duodenum. However, bacteria are equipped with an array of defense mechanisms to counteract intracellular damage or to enhance the robustness of the cell to withstand lethal external environments. Understanding these mechanisms in probiotic bacteria and indeed other bacterial groups has resulted in the development of a molecular toolbox to augment the technological and gastrointestinal performance of probiotics. This has been greatly aided by studies which examine the global cellular responses to stress highlighting distinct regulatory networks and which also identify novel mechanisms used by cells to cope with hazardous environments. This review highlights the latest studies which have exploited the bacterial stress response with a view to producing next-generation probiotic cultures and highlights the significance of studies which view the global bacterial stress response from an integrative systems biology perspective. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (SFI-CSET) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.relation.uri http://www.microbialcellfactories.com/content/10/S1/S19
dc.rights © 2011 Mills et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en
dc.subject Probiotic bacteria en
dc.subject Food processing en
dc.subject Gastrointestinal tract (GIT) en
dc.subject Global cellular response en
dc.subject Bacterial stress response en
dc.subject.lcsh Microbiology. en
dc.title Enhancing the stress responses of probiotics for a lifestyle from gut to product and back again en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorurl http://www.ucc.ie/research/apc/content/bio/catherine_stanton.html en
dc.internal.authorurl http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/D010/gfitzgerald en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Gerald Fitzgerald, Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, College Road, Cork, Ireland. Email: g.fitzgerald@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Microbial Cell Factories en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress g.fitzgerald@ucc.ie en


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© 2011 Mills et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2011 Mills et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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