A two-tiered public-private health system: Who stays in (private) hospitals in Ireland?

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dc.contributor.author Murphy, Aileen
dc.contributor.author Bourke, Jane
dc.contributor.author Turner, Brian
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-30T09:49:22Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-30T09:49:22Z
dc.date.issued 2020-05-13
dc.identifier.citation Murphy, A., Bourke, J. and Turner, B. (2020) 'A two-tiered public-private health system: Who stays in (private) hospitals in Ireland?', Health Policy, 124(7), pp. 765-771. doi: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2020.04.003 en
dc.identifier.volume 124 en
dc.identifier.issued 7 en
dc.identifier.startpage 765 en
dc.identifier.endpage 771 en
dc.identifier.issn 0168-8510
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10333
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.healthpol.2020.04.003 en
dc.description.abstract Despite efforts to create a universal, single-tiered Irish health system, an unequal "two-tiered" system persists. The future blueprint for Irish health care, Sláintecare, recommends a separation of public and private hospital treatment. This study examines patterns of overall and private hospital utilisation in Ireland that could help identify some of the impacts of the proposed separation of public and private hospital treatment. Using data from EU-SILC (2016) (n = 10,131) the factors associated with inpatient hospitalisation and private inpatient hospitalisation are estimated using probit models. Unsurprisingly, those who are economically inactive are more likely to have had an inpatient stay. Furthermore, those aged over 65, with a chronic illness, with a medical/ GP visit card and private health insurance and those with only private health insurance are also more likely to have had an inpatient stay. Those with only primary education are less likely to report an inpatient stay in private hospital. Those aged over 25 and less than 65, those with a medical/ GP visit card and private health insurance and those with only private health insurance are significantly more likely to opt for a private hospital. Understanding overall and private hospital utilisation patterns is imperative for implementing universal health care and associated resource planning and fulfilling policy recommendations. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.relation.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851020300889
dc.rights © 2020, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Hospital stay en
dc.subject Private hospitals en
dc.subject Health system reform en
dc.subject Access en
dc.title A two-tiered public-private health system: Who stays in (private) hospitals in Ireland? en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Aileen Murphy, Economics, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: aileen.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-05-13
dc.date.updated 2020-07-29T11:43:42Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 528222468
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Health Policy en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress aileen.murphy@ucc.ie en


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© 2020, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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