Preparing students for social work practice in contemporary societies: Insights from a transnational research network

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dc.contributor.author Laidlaw, Kirsteen
dc.contributor.author Cabiati, Elena
dc.contributor.author Henriksen, Oystein
dc.contributor.author Shore, Caroline
dc.date.accessioned 2020-08-19T11:38:56Z
dc.date.available 2020-08-19T11:38:56Z
dc.date.issued 2020-07-20
dc.identifier.citation Laidlaw, K., Cabiati, E., Henriksen, O. and Shore, C. (2020) 'Preparing students for social work practice in contemporary societies: Insights from a transnational research network', European Journal of Social Work. doi: 10.1080/13691457.2020.1793108 en
dc.identifier.issn 1369-1457
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10409
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/13691457.2020.1793108 en
dc.description.abstract This paper arises from a transnational research network investigating social work education. University based social work programmes from four European countries (Ireland, Italy, Norway, and the U.K.) shared a similar concern: how educators can support students to prepare for social work practice. The relationship between social work education and practice is not straightforward; the partnership between educators and practitioners in helping social work students to flourish in practice remains a complex and, at times, controversial issue. Furthermore, it is not enough to help students learn the mechanics of day to day tasks, it is also important to motivate them in becoming social workers stimulated by principles of human rights and social justice. With this in mind, each educator conducted a local study using qualitative and/or quantitative methods to explore what influences the development of such practitioners. Analysis from the studies indicate three key issues for social work education in Europe: developing strategies to help students in preventing and overcoming 'practice shock'; the promotion of coherence as a way to bring into focus the complexity of the interrelationships between theory and practice; the active engagement of students and practice teachers in the evaluation and development of contemporary social work education models. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis Group en
dc.rights © 2020, Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. All rights reserved. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an item published by Taylor & Francis in European Journal of Social Work on 20 July 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1080/13691457.2020.1793108 en
dc.subject Social work education en
dc.subject Transnational research network Coherence en
dc.subject Practice shock en
dc.subject Practice-readiness en
dc.subject European social work research en
dc.title Preparing students for social work practice in contemporary societies: Insights from a transnational research network en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Caroline May Shore, Applied Social Studies, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: c.shore@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2021-07-20
dc.date.updated 2020-08-19T11:31:36Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 526632593
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle European Journal of Social Work en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress c.shore@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation as necessary. en
dc.identifier.eissn 1468-2664


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