The transformation of Ireland 1958 - 93: the role of ideas in punctuating institutional path dependency at critical junctures

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dc.contributor.advisor Murphy, Mary C. en
dc.contributor.advisor Collins, Neil en
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Timothy J.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-04-15T10:43:11Z
dc.date.available 2013-04-15T10:43:11Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.date.submitted 2011
dc.identifier.citation McCarthy, T. J. 2011. The transformation of Ireland 1958 - 93: the role of ideas in punctuating institutional path dependency at critical junctures. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1070
dc.description.abstract Ireland experienced two critical junctures when its economic survival was threatened: 1958/9 and 1986/7. Common to both crises was the supplanting of long established practices, that had become an integral part of the political culture of the state, by new ideas that ensured eventual economic recovery. In their adoption and implementation these ideas also fundamentally changed the institutions of state – how politics was done, how it was organised and regulated. The end result was the transformation of the Irish state. The main hypothesis of this thesis is that at those critical junctures the political and administrative elites who enabled economic recovery were not just making pragmatic decisions, their actions were influenced by ideas. Systematic content analysis of the published works of the main ideational actors, together with primary interviews with those actors still alive, reveals how their ideas were formed, what influenced them, and how they set about implementing their ideas. As the hypothesis assumes institutional change over time historical institutionalism serves as the theoretical framework. Central to this theory is the idea that choices made when a policy is being initiated or an institution formed will have a continuing influence long into the future. Institutions of state become ‘path dependent’ and impervious to change – the forces of inertia take over. That path dependency is broken at critical junctures. At those moments ideas play a major role as they offer a set of ready-made solutions. Historical institutionalism serves as a robust framework for proving that in the transformation of Ireland the role of ideas in punctuating institutional path dependency at critical junctures was central. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2011, Timothy J. McCarthy en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Irish State en
dc.subject Irish economy en
dc.subject Political culture en
dc.subject Economic recovery en
dc.subject Political ideology en
dc.subject Institutional change en
dc.subject Historical institutionalism en
dc.subject Administrative change en
dc.subject Free Trade en
dc.subject Government policy en
dc.subject Social partnership en
dc.subject.lcsh Ireland--Politics and government. en
dc.title The transformation of Ireland 1958 - 93: the role of ideas in punctuating institutional path dependency at critical junctures en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Commerce) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info No embargo required en
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Government en
dc.check.type No Embargo Required
dc.check.reason No embargo required en
dc.check.opt-out Not applicable en
dc.thesis.opt-out false *
dc.check.embargoformat Not applicable en
ucc.workflow.supervisor alancollins@ucc.ie *


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