Fast acquisition abdominal MRI study for the investigation of suspected acute appendicitis in paediatric patients

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author James, Karl
dc.contributor.author Duffy, Patrick
dc.contributor.author Kavanagh, Richard G.
dc.contributor.author Carey, Brian W.
dc.contributor.author Power, Stephen
dc.contributor.author Ryan, David
dc.contributor.author Joyce, Stella
dc.contributor.author Feeley, Aoife
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Peter
dc.contributor.author Andrews, Emmet
dc.contributor.author McEntee, Mark F.
dc.contributor.author Moore, Michael
dc.contributor.author Bogue, Conor
dc.contributor.author Maher, Michael M.
dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Owen J.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-16T12:43:12Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-16T12:43:12Z
dc.date.issued 2020-06-16
dc.identifier.citation James, K., Duffy, P., Kavanagh, R. G., Carey, B. W., Power, S., Ryan, D., Joyce, S., Feeley, A., Murphy, P., Andrews, E., McEntee, M. F., Moore, M., Bogue, C., Maher, M. M. and O’ Connor, O. J. (2020) 'Fast acquisition abdominal MRI study for the investigation of suspected acute appendicitis in paediatric patients', Insights into Imaging, 11(1), 78 (11 pp). doi: 10.1186/s13244-020-00882-7 en
dc.identifier.volume 11 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 11 en
dc.identifier.issn 1869-4101
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10760
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s13244-020-00882-7 en
dc.description.abstract Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of fast acquisition MRI in suspected cases of paediatric appendicitis presenting to a tertiary referral hospital. Materials and methods: A prospective study was undertaken between May and October 2017 of 52 children who presented with suspected appendicitis and were referred for an abdominal ultrasound. All patients included in this study received both an abdominal ultrasound and five-sequence MRI consisting of axial and coronal gradient echo T2 scans, fat-saturated SSFSE and a diffusion-weighted scan. Participants were randomised into groups of MRI with breath-holds or MRI with free breathing. A patient satisfaction survey was also carried out. Histopathology findings, where available, were used as a gold standard for the purposes of data analysis. Statistical analysis was performed, and p values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Ultrasound had a sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 92.9%, respectively. MRI with breath-hold had a sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% and 66.7%, respectively, whilst MRI with free breathing was superior with sensitivity and specificity of 92.3% and 84.2%, respectively. MRI with free breathing was also more time efficient (p < 0.0001). Group statistics were comparable (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of fast acquisition MRI protocols, particularly free breathing sequences, for patients admitted with suspected appendicitis can result in faster diagnosis, treatment and discharge. It also has a statistically significant diagnostic advantage over ultrasound. Additionally, the higher specificity of MR can reduce the number of negative appendectomies performed in tertiary centres. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Springer en
dc.relation.uri https://insightsimaging.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13244-020-00882-7
dc.rights © The Author(s). 2020. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. en
dc.subject Acute appendicitis en
dc.subject Magnetic resonance imaging en
dc.subject Paediatric en
dc.subject Ultrasound en
dc.title Fast acquisition abdominal MRI study for the investigation of suspected acute appendicitis in paediatric patients en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Owen O'Connor, Medicine , University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: oj.oconnor@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2020-11-13T17:21:46Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 521860066
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Insights into Imaging en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress oj.oconnor@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 78 en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© The Author(s). 2020. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s). 2020. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement