Cardiovascular responses to stress utilizing anticipatory singing tasks

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dc.contributor.author Jump, Owen
dc.contributor.author Dockray, Samantha
dc.date.accessioned 2020-12-04T11:53:09Z
dc.date.available 2020-12-04T11:53:09Z
dc.date.issued 2020-11-16
dc.identifier.citation Jump, O. and Dockray, S. (2020) 'Cardiovascular responses to stress utilizing anticipatory singing tasks', Psychophysiology. doi: 10.1027/0269-8803/a000269 en
dc.identifier.issn 0269-8803
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10815
dc.identifier.doi 10.1027/0269-8803/a000269 en
dc.description.abstract Models of psychobiological stress reactivity have a foundation in the measurement of responses to standardized stress tasks. Tasks with anticipatory phases have been proposed as an effective method of stress induction, either as a stand-Alone task or replacement constituent elements for existing stressor paradigms. Tasks utilizing singing as a primary stressor have been proposed but the efficacy of these tasks have not been demonstrated while maintaining adherence to a resting/reactivity/recovery framework desirable for heart rate variability (HRV) measurement. This study examines the viability of an anticipatory sing-A-song task as a method for inducing mental stress and examines the utility of the task with specific reference to measures of cardiovascular reactivity and recovery activity, and standard protocols to examine HRV reactivity and recovery. Participants completed a dual task with a math task and an anticipation of singing component. Responses were examined according to a resting/reactivity/recovery paradigm and the findings indicate that the sing-A-song stimulus is effective in generating a stress response. Significant differences in heart rate and self-reported stress between baseline and stressor conditions were detected, with greater magnitude differences between baseline and anticipatory phases. This study has demonstrated the viability of the anticipation of singing as a standardized stressor using cardiovascular measures and has described variants of this task that may be used for repeated measures study designs. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Hogrefe Publishing on behalf of the Federation of European Psychophysiology Societies en
dc.rights © 2020, Hogrefe Publishing. This version of the article may not completely replicate the final authoritative version published in Journal of Psychophysiology at https://doi.org/10.1027/0269-8803/a000269. It is not the version of record and is therefore not suitable for citation. Please do not copy or cite without the permission of the authors. en
dc.subject Anticipatory stress en
dc.subject Heart rate variability en
dc.subject Measurement en
dc.subject Social evaluative stress en
dc.subject Stress testing en
dc.title Cardiovascular responses to stress utilizing anticipatory singing tasks en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Owen Jump, CIRTL, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: owen.jump@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2020-12-04T11:35:02Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 546325704
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Psychophysiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress owen.jump@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation as necessary. en
dc.identifier.eissn 2151-2124


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