The gut microbiota in anxiety and depression - A systematic review

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dc.contributor.author Simpson, Carra A.
dc.contributor.author Diaz-Arteche, Carmela
dc.contributor.author Eliby, Djamila
dc.contributor.author Schwartz, Orli S.
dc.contributor.author Simmons, Julian G.
dc.contributor.author Cowan, Caitlin S. M.
dc.date.accessioned 2021-01-14T09:48:23Z
dc.date.available 2021-01-14T09:48:23Z
dc.date.issued 2020-10-29
dc.identifier.citation Simpson, C. A., Diaz-Arteche, C., Eliby, D., Schwartz, O. S., Simmons, J. G. and Cowan, C. S. M. (2020) 'The gut microbiota in anxiety and depression - A systematic review', Clinical Psychology Review, 83, 101943 (18pp). doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2020.101943 en
dc.identifier.volume 83 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 18 en
dc.identifier.issn 1873-7811
dc.identifier.issn 0272-7358
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/10910
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.cpr.2020.101943 en
dc.description.abstract Growing evidence indicates the community of microorganisms throughout the gastrointestinal tract, (i.e., gut microbiota), is associated with anxiety and depressive disorders. We present the first systematic review of the gut microbiota in anxiety disorders, along with an update in depression. Consideration of shared underlying features is essential due to the high rates of comorbidity. Systematic searches, following PRISMA guidelines, identified 26 studies (two case-control comparisons of the gut microbiota in generalised anxiety disorder, 18 in depression, one incorporating both anxiety/depression, and five including symptom-only measures). Alpha and beta diversity findings were inconsistent; however, differences in bacterial taxa indicated disorders may be characterised by a higher abundance of proinflammatory species (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrio), and lower short-chain fatty acid producing-bacteria (e.g., Faecalibacterium). Several taxa, and their mechanisms of action, may relate to anxiety and depression pathophysiology via communication of peripheral inflammation to the brain. Although the gut microbiota remains a promising target for prevention and therapy, future research should assess confounders, particularly diet and psychotropic medications, and should examine microorganism function. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2020, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Anxiety disorders en
dc.subject Depression en
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Gut-brain axis en
dc.subject Microbiota en
dc.title The gut microbiota in anxiety and depression - A systematic review en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Caitlin Cowan, APC Microbiome, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: caitlin.cowan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2022-10-29
dc.date.updated 2021-01-14T09:34:45Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 551342035
dc.internal.pmid 33271426
dc.contributor.funder Australian Government Research Training Program en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Clinical Psychology Review en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress caitlin.cowan@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 101943 en


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© 2020, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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