Prevalence and determinants of substance use among indigenous tribes in South India: Findings from a tribal household survey

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dc.contributor.author Sadath, Anvar
dc.contributor.author Jose, Kurian
dc.contributor.author Jiji, K. M.
dc.contributor.author Mercy, V. T.
dc.contributor.author Ragesh, G.
dc.contributor.author Arensman, Ella
dc.date.accessioned 2021-02-15T12:25:07Z
dc.date.available 2021-02-15T12:25:07Z
dc.date.issued 2021-01-25
dc.identifier.citation Sadath, A., Jose, K., Jiji, K. M., Mercy, V. T., Ragesh, G. and Arensman, E. (2021) 'Prevalence and determinants of substance use among indigenous tribes in South India: Findings from a tribal household survey', Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. doi: 10.1007/s40615-021-00964-2 en
dc.identifier.issn 2197-3792
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/11065
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s40615-021-00964-2 en
dc.description.abstract Background: Indigenous populations have higher substance use than non-indigenous populations. Current evidence on indigenous substance use is largely derived from national household surveys, while there are no specifically designed, culturally specific methodological studies available to determine the prevalence of substance abuse among the indigenous tribes. The present study examined the prevalence and predictors of alcohol use, smoking, and betel quid chewing among indigenous tribes in South India. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional population-based random survey of 2186 tribal households in the Wayanad District, Kerala. A self-prepared, pilot-tested structured interview schedule was used to collect information on sociodemographic variables and substance use. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the sociodemographic predictors of substance use. Results: The overall prevalence of current alcohol use, current smoking and daily betel quid use was 17.2%, 18.8% and 47.6% respectively. Consistently, male gender (alcohol use OR = 13.55; smoking OR = 3.42; betel quid use OR = 1.65), increasing age (OR = 1.32; OR = 1.01; OR = 1.03), Paniya tribe status (OR = 2.24; OR = 1.39; OR = 5.38) and employment status being working (OR = 2.07; OR = 1.77; OR = 1.26) increased the risk of alcohol use, smoking and betel quid chewing. Furthermore, having ‘no formal education’ was associated with smoking (OR = 1.35), and betel quid chewing (OR = 3.27). Conclusion: Substance use was high among the indigenous tribes. The male gender, increasing age, Paniya tribe and working status significantly influenced alcohol use, smoking and betel quid chewing. The results underscore the need for indigenous specific de-addiction policies and programmes, alongside a consideration of the critical sociodemographic predictors. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Springer Nature Switzerland AG en
dc.rights © 2021, W. Montague Cobb-NMA Health Institute. Published by Springer Nature Switzerland AG. This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-021-00964-2 en
dc.subject Alcohol use en
dc.subject Smoking en
dc.subject Betel quid en
dc.subject Indigenous population en
dc.subject Tribes en
dc.subject South India en
dc.title Prevalence and determinants of substance use among indigenous tribes in South India: Findings from a tribal household survey en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Anvar Sadath Vakkayil, Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: anvar.sadathvakkayil@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2022-01-25
dc.date.updated 2021-02-15T11:53:44Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 555265394
dc.internal.pmid 33495925
dc.contributor.funder Government of Kerala en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress anvar.sadathvakkayil@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Check vol / issue / page range. Amend citation as necessary. en
dc.identifier.eissn 2196-8837


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