Not thinking straight? A critical discourse analysis of the 2006 Irish High Court ruling in Zappone and Gilligan v. Revenue Commissioners and Attorney General

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dc.contributor.advisor Leane, Máire en
dc.contributor.advisor O'Riordan, Jacqui en
dc.contributor.author Mullins, Jackie (Gertrude Jacqueline)
dc.date.accessioned 2013-05-16T08:46:38Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-17T04:00:04Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.date.submitted 2013
dc.identifier.citation Mullins, J. 2013. Not thinking straight? A critical discourse analysis of the 2006 Irish High Court ruling in Zappone and Gilligan v. Revenue Commissioners and Attorney General. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.endpage 413
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1128
dc.description.abstract The recognition and protection of constitutional rights is a fundamental precept. In Ireland, the right to marry is provided for in the equality provisions of Article 40 of the Irish Constitution (1937). However, lesbians and gay men are denied the right to marry in Ireland. The ‘last word’ on this issue came into being in the High Court in 2006, when Katherine Zappone and Ann Louise Gilligan sought, but failed, to have their Canadian marriage recognised in Ireland. My thesis centres on this constitutional court ruling. So as to contextualise the pursuit of marriage equality in Ireland, I provide details of the Irish trajectory vis-à-vis relationship and family recognition for same-sex couples. In Chapter One, I discuss the methodological orientation of my research, which derives from a critical perspective. Chapter Two denotes my theorisation of the principle of equality and the concept of difference. In Chapter Three, I discuss the history of the institution of marriage in the West with its legislative underpinning. Marriage also has a constitutional underpinning in Ireland, which derives from Article 41 of our Constitution. In Chapter Four, I discuss ways in which marriage and family were conceptualised in Ireland, by looking at historical controversies surrounding the legalisation of contraception and divorce. Chapter Five denotes a Critical Discourse Analysis of the High Court ruling in Zappone and Gilligan. In Chapter Six, I critique text from three genres of discourse, i.e. ‘Letters to the Editor’ regarding same-sex marriage in Ireland, communication from legislators vis-à-vis the 2004 legislative impediment to same-sex marriage in Ireland, and parliamentary debates surrounding the 2010 enactment of civil partnership legislation in Ireland. I conclude my research by reflecting on my methodological and theoretical considerations with a view to answering my research questions. Author’s Update: Following the outcome of the 2015 constitutional referendum vis-à-vis Article 41, marriage equality has been realised in Ireland. en
dc.description.sponsorship University College Cork (William Thompson Scholarship, Applied Social Studies, UCC) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.relation.uri http://library.ucc.ie/record=b2073900
dc.rights © 2013, Jackie Mullins en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Zappone and Gilligan en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.subject Irish Constitution, 1937 en
dc.subject Civil Registration Act, 2004 en
dc.subject Equality en
dc.subject Critical discourse analysis en
dc.subject Marriage equality en
dc.subject Same sex marriage en
dc.subject.lcsh Same-sex marriage--Law and legislation--Ireland. en
dc.subject.lcsh Gay couples--Legal status, laws, etc.--Ireland. en
dc.subject.lcsh Gilligan, Ann Louise en
dc.subject.lcsh Zappone, Katherine en
dc.title Not thinking straight? A critical discourse analysis of the 2006 Irish High Court ruling in Zappone and Gilligan v. Revenue Commissioners and Attorney General en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Arts) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Applied Social Studies en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Not applicable en
dc.thesis.opt-out false *
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat E-thesis on CORA only en
ucc.workflow.supervisor m.leane@ucc.ie *


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