The effect of COVID-19 lockdowns on women's perinatal mental health: a systematic review

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dc.contributor.author Wall, Stephanie
dc.contributor.author Dempsey, Maria
dc.date.accessioned 2022-08-04T11:21:43Z
dc.date.available 2022-08-04T11:21:43Z
dc.date.issued 2022-06-17
dc.identifier.citation Wall, S. and Dempsey, M. (2022) 'The effect of COVID-19 lockdowns on women's perinatal mental health: a systematic review', Women and Birth. doi: 10.1016/j.wombi.2022.06.005 en
dc.identifier.issn 1871-5192
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/13453
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.wombi.2022.06.005 en
dc.description.abstract Background: Risk factors for poor maternal perinatal mental health include a previous mental health diagnosis, reduced access to perinatal services, economic concerns and decreased levels of social support. Adverse maternal perinatal mental health can negatively influence the psychological wellbeing of infants. The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic presented an additional stressor. While literature on the impact of COVID-19 on perinatal mental health exists, no systematic review has focused specifically on maternal perinatal mental health during periods of COVID-19 lockdown. Aims: This systematic review explores how periods of COVID-19 lockdown impacted women's perinatal mental health. Methods: Searches of CINAHL, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science were conducted for literature from 1st January 2020 - 25th May 2021. Quantitative, peer-reviewed, cross-sectional studies published in English with perinatal women as participants, and data collected during a period of lockdown, were included. Data was assessed for quality and narratively synthesized. Findings: Sixteen articles from nine countries met the inclusion criteria. COVID-19 lockdowns negatively impacted perinatal mental health. Risk factors for negative perinatal mental health noted in previous literature were confirmed. In addition, resilience, educational attainment, trimester, and ethnicity were identified as other variables which may influence mental health during perinatal periods experienced during lockdown. Understanding nuance in experience and harnessing intra and interpersonal support could advance options for intervention. Conclusion: Developing resources for perinatal women that integrate informal sources of support may aid them when normal routine is challenged, and may mediate potential long-term impacts of poor perinatal maternal health on infants. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2022, Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Systematic review en
dc.subject Perinatal en
dc.subject Mental health en
dc.subject Women en
dc.subject COVID-19 en
dc.subject Lockdown en
dc.title The effect of COVID-19 lockdowns on women's perinatal mental health: a systematic review en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Stephanie Wall, Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: swall@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 24 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2024-06-17
dc.date.updated 2022-08-04T11:14:26Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 622247314
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Women and Birth en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress swall@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck In press. Add vol / issue / page numbers. Amend citation and copyright statement as necessary. en


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© 2022, Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2022, Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. This manuscript version is made available under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 license.
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