The impact of new public management on the roles of elected councillors, management and the community sector in Irish local government: a case study of Cork County Council

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dc.contributor.advisor Collins, Neil en
dc.contributor.author Quinlivan, Aodh
dc.date.accessioned 2014-05-08T16:13:47Z
dc.date.available 2014-05-08T16:13:47Z
dc.date.issued 2000
dc.date.submitted 2000
dc.identifier.citation Quinlivan, A. 2000. The impact of new public management on the roles of elected councillors, management and the community sector in Irish local government: a case study of Cork County Council. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1551
dc.description.abstract The fundamental aim of this thesis is to examine the effect of New Public Management (NPM) on the traditional roles of elected representatives, management and community activists in Irish local government. This will be achieved through a case study analysis of one local authority, Cork County Council. NPM promises greater democracy in decision-making. Therefore, one can hypothesise that the roles of the three key groupings identified will become more influenced by principles of participatory decision-making. Thus, a number of related questions will be addressed by this work, such as, have the local elected representatives been empowered by NPM? Has a managerial revolution taken place? Has local democracy been enhanced by more effective community participation? It will be seen in chapter 2 that these questions have not been adequately addressed to date in NPM literature. The three groups identified can be regarded as stakeholders although the researcher is cautious in using this term because of its value-laden nature. Essentially, in terms of Cork County Council, stakeholders can be defined as decision-makers and people within the organization and its environment who are interested in or could be affected directly or indirectly by organizational performance. This is an all-embracing definition and includes all citizens, residents, community groups and client organizations. It is in this context that the term 'stakeholder' should be understood when it is occasionally used in this thesis. In this case, the perceptions of elected councilors, management and community representatives with regard to their changing roles are as significant as the changes themselves. The chapter begins with a brief account of the background to this research. This is followed by an explanation of the methodology which is used and then concludes with short statements about the remaining chapters in the thesis. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language English en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.relation.uri http://library.ucc.ie/record=b1315598
dc.rights © 2000, Aodh Quinlivan en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Cork County Council en
dc.subject Community Sector en
dc.subject Elected representatives en
dc.subject Irish local government en
dc.subject.lcsh Cork--Politics and government en
dc.title The impact of new public management on the roles of elected councillors, management and the community sector in Irish local government: a case study of Cork County Council en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Commerce) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info No embargo required en
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Government en
dc.check.type No Embargo Required
dc.check.reason No embargo required en
dc.check.opt-out Not applicable en
dc.thesis.opt-out false
dc.check.embargoformat Not applicable en
ucc.workflow.supervisor cora@ucc.ie


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© 2000, Aodh Quinlivan Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2000, Aodh Quinlivan
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