Health in the medieval world: Regionality and the bioarchaeology of Ireland and Britain

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dc.contributor.advisor O'Donnabhain, Barra en
dc.contributor.author Tesorieri, Mara Lee
dc.date.accessioned 2015-08-21T13:31:07Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.date.submitted 2014
dc.identifier.citation Tesorieri, M. L. 2014. Health in the medieval world: Regionality and the bioarchaeology of Ireland and Britain. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1943
dc.description.abstract This study assesses regional health patterns in early medieval Ireland and Britain by analysing and interpreting palaeopathological indicators of stress. This was achieved by incorporating the results of demographic and palaeopathological study into the specific historical contexts. Although relatively small islands, both are home to unique and diverse cultural, physical, and political landscapes, which could potentially affect the general health of the population in different ways. To accurately answer the research question, a bioarchaeological survey of six regions within both islands was carried out, specifically analysing and comparing the demographic profile and general health trends within each region with one another. Results from the analysis have demonstrated statistically significant differences within and between the islands. Inferring that even the more subtle differences observed within the cultural, physical, and political landscapes, such as in the case of Ireland and Britain, can and do affect general health trends. The health of early medieval Ireland and Britain appears to be significantly affected by the physical landscape, specifically a north/south divide. The most northerly regions, Scotland South and Ireland North, manifested higher levels of stress indicators when compared to the more southerly positioned regions. Although it can only be hypothesised what factors within these regions are causing, enhancing or buffering stress, the study has established the potential and necessity for regional work to be continued when interpreting the historical past of these two islands. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2014, Mara L. Tesorieri en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Early medieval en
dc.subject England en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.subject Scotland en
dc.subject Wales en
dc.subject Stress en
dc.subject Non-specific stress indicators en
dc.subject Regional studies en
dc.subject Bioarchaeology en
dc.title Health in the medieval world: Regionality and the bioarchaeology of Ireland and Britain en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Arts) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Indefinite en
dc.check.date 10000-01-01
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Archaeology en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Yes en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat Both hard copy thesis and e-thesis en
dc.internal.conferring Autumn Conferring 2014


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© 2014, Mara L. Tesorieri Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014, Mara L. Tesorieri
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