Anticipatory vigilance: A classic grounded theory of risk reduction and management in the perioperative setting

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dc.contributor.advisor Andrews, Tom en
dc.contributor.advisor Savage, Eileen en
dc.contributor.author O'Brien, Bridget
dc.date.accessioned 2015-08-24T13:06:29Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.date.submitted 2014
dc.identifier.citation O'Brien, B. 2014. Anticipatory vigilance: A classic grounded theory of risk reduction and management in the perioperative setting. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/1945
dc.description.abstract This research aimed to investigate the main concern facing nurses in minimising risk within the perioperative setting and to generate an explanatory substantive theory of how they resolve this through anticipatory vigilance. In the context of the perioperative setting, nurses encounter challenges in minimising risks for their patients on a continuous basis. Current explanations of minimising risk in the perioperative setting offers insights into how perioperative nurses undertake their work. Currently research in minimising risk is broadly related to dealing with errors as opposed to preventing them. To date, little is known about how perioperative nurses practice and maintain safety. This study was guided by the principles of classic grounded theory as described by Glaser (1978, 1998, 2001). Data was collected through individual unstructured interviews with thirty seven perioperative nurses (with varying lengths of experiences of working in the area) and thirty three hours of non-participant observation within eight different perioperative settings in the Republic of Ireland. Data was simultaneously collected and analysed. The theory of anticipatory vigilance emerged as the pattern of behaviour through which nurse’s deal with their main concern of minimising risk in a high risk setting. Anticipatory vigilance is enacted through orchestrating, routinising and momentary adapting within a spirit of trusting relations within the substantive area of the perioperative setting. This theory of offers an explanation on how nurses resolve their main concern of minimising risk within the perioperative setting. The theory of anticipatory vigilance will be useful to nurses in providing a comprehensive framework of explanation and understanding on how nurses deal with minimising risk in the perioperative setting. The theory links perioperative nursing, risk and vigilance together. Clinical improvements through understanding and awareness of the theory of anticipatory vigilance will result in an improved quality environment, leading to safe patient outcomes. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2014, Bridget O'Brien. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Risk en
dc.subject Safety en
dc.subject Grounded theory en
dc.subject Perioperative nursing en
dc.title Anticipatory vigilance: A classic grounded theory of risk reduction and management in the perioperative setting en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PHD (Nursing) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Indefinite en
dc.check.date 10000-01-01
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Nursing and Midwifery en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Yes en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat Both hard copy thesis and e-thesis en
dc.internal.conferring Summer Conferring 2014


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© 2014, Bridget O'Brien. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014, Bridget O'Brien.
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