Metabolism of host-derived carbohydrates by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

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dc.contributor.advisor van Sinderen, Douwe en
dc.contributor.author Egan, Muireann
dc.date.accessioned 2015-11-13T09:51:15Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.date.submitted 2015
dc.identifier.citation Egan, M. 2015. Metabolism of host-derived carbohydrates by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2061
dc.description.abstract Bifidobacteria are Gram positive, anaerobic, typically Y-shaped bacteria which are naturally found in the digestive tract of certain mammals, birds and insects. Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of many healthy breast-fed infants. The prototypical B. breve strain UCC2003 has previously been shown to utilise numerous carbohydrates of plant origin. Various aspects of host-derived carbohydrate metabolism occurring in this bacterium will be described in this thesis. Chapter II describes B. breve UCC2003 utilisation of sialic acid, a nine-carbon monosaccharide, which is found in human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) and the mucin glycoprotein. B. breve UCC2003 was also shown to cross-feed on sialic acid released from 3’ sialyllactose, a prominent HMO, by the extracellular sialidase activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. Chapter III reports on the transcriptional regulation of sialic acid metabolism in B. breve UCC2003 by a transcriptional repressor encoded by the nanR gene. NanR belongs to the GntR-family of transcriptional regulators and represents the first bifidobacterial member of this family to be characterised. Chapter IV investigates B. breve UCC2003 utilisation of mucin. B. breve UCC2003 was shown to be incapable of degrading mucin; however when grown in co-culture with B. bifidum PRL2010 it exhibits enhanced growth and survival properties. A number of methods were used to investigate and identify the mucin components supporting this enhanced growth/viability phenotype. Chapter V describes the characterisation of two sulfatase-encoding gene clusters from B. breve UCC2003. The transcriptional regulation of both sulfatase-encoding gene clusters was also investigated. The work presented in this thesis represents new information on the metabolism of host-derived carbohydrates in bifidobacteria, thus increasing our understanding of how these gut commensals are able to colonise and persist in the gastrointestinal tract. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (SFI Grant Nos. 07/CE/B1368 and 12/RC/2273) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2015, Muireann Egan. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Bifidobacteria en
dc.subject Probiotic en
dc.subject Human milk oligosaccharides en
dc.subject Sialic acid en
dc.subject Mucin en
dc.subject Host-derived carbohydrates en
dc.title Metabolism of host-derived carbohydrates by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Science) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out No en
dc.thesis.opt-out false
ucc.workflow.supervisor d.vansinderen@ucc.ie
dc.internal.conferring Summer Conferring 2015


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© 2015, Muireann Egan. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015, Muireann Egan.
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