Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients’ attitudes and experiences with health services

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dc.contributor.author Delea, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Buckley, Claire M.
dc.contributor.author Hanrahan, Andrew
dc.contributor.author McGreal, Gerald
dc.contributor.author Desmond, Deirdre
dc.contributor.author McHugh, Sheena M.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-15T17:10:50Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-15T17:10:50Z
dc.date.issued 2015-07-01
dc.identifier.citation DELEA, S., BUCKLEY, C., HANRAHAN, A., MCGREAL, G., DESMOND, D. & MCHUGH, S. 2015. Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients’ attitudes and experiences with health services. BMC Health Services Research, 15:251, 1-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-015-0926-9 en
dc.identifier.volume 15 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1472-6963
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2190
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12913-015-0926-9
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness that places a huge burden on the individual, the health system and society. Patients with active foot disease and lower limb amputations due to diabetes have a significant amount of interaction with the health care services. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of foot care services in Ireland among people with diabetes and active foot disease or lower limb amputations. METHODS: A purposive sample of individuals who had either active foot disease or a lower limb amputation as a result of diabetes were recruited from the Prosthetic, Orthotic and Limb Absence Rehabilitation (POLAR) Unit of an Irish hospital. One-to-one interviews were conducted in the POLAR unit using a semi-structured topic guide. Thematic analysis was used to identify, analyse and describe patterns within the data. RESULTS: Ten males participated in the study. Most participants expressed a need for emotional support alongside the medical management of their condition. There were substantial differences between participants with regard to the level of education and information they appeared to have received regarding their illness. There were also variations in levels of service received. Transport and medication costs were considered barriers. Having a medical card, which entitles the holder to free medical care, eased the burden of the patient’s illness. A number of participants attributed some of the problems they faced with services to the health care system as a whole rather than health care professionals. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that rehabilitation services should place a strong focus on psychological as well as physical adjustment to active foot disease or lower limb amputations. The delivery of services needs to be standardised to ensure equal access to medical care and supplies among people with or at risk of lower extremity amputations. The wider social circumstances of patients should be taken into consideration by health care professionals to provide effective support while patients adjust to this potentially life changing complication. The patient’s perspective should also be used to inform health service managers and health professionals on ways to improve services. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2015 Delea et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http:// creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Diabetes en
dc.subject Foot disease en
dc.subject Lower limb amputation en
dc.subject Health services en
dc.subject Patient experience en
dc.title Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients’ attitudes and experiences with health services en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother McHugh, Sheena M. Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-420-5526 Email: s.mchugh@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Health Services Research en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Open Access articles licensed via CC-BY 4.0 with UCC affiliated authors. Uploaded Jan 2016. en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress s.mchugh@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 251


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© 2015 Delea et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http:// creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Delea et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http:// creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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