The influence of partial public reimbursement on vaccination uptake in the older population: a cross-sectional study

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dc.contributor.author McHugh, Sheena M.
dc.contributor.author Browne, John P.
dc.contributor.author O'Neill, Ciaran
dc.contributor.author Kearney, Patricia M.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-01-18T16:34:01Z
dc.date.available 2016-01-18T16:34:01Z
dc.date.issued 2015-02-05
dc.identifier.citation MC HUGH, S. M., BROWNE, J. P., O’NEILL, C. & KEARNEY, P. M. 2015. The influence of partial public reimbursement on vaccination uptake in the older population: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 15:83, 1-7. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-015-1356-7 en
dc.identifier.volume 15 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 7 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2191
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/s12889-015-1356-7
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Flu vaccination is recommended annually for high risk groups. However, in Ireland, free access to vaccination is not universal for those in high risk groups; the vaccine and consultation are only free for those with a medical card, a means tested scheme. Few private health insurance policies cover the cost of attendance for vaccination in general practice. The aim was to examine the influence of this reimbursement policy on vaccination coverage among older adults. METHODS: Cross-sectional wave 1 data from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) were analysed (2009–2011). TILDA is a nationally representative prospective cohort study of adults aged ≥50, sampled using multistage stratified clustered sampling. Self-reported entitlement to healthcare was categorised as 1) medical card only 2) private health insurance only, 3) both and 4) neither. The outcome was responses to ‘have you ever had a flu shot’. Multivariate logistic regression was used, adjusting for age and need. RESULTS: 68.6% of those defined as clinically high-risk received the flu vaccination in the past (95% CI = 67-71%). Those with a medical card were almost twice as likely to have been vaccinated, controlling for age and chronic illness (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.5-2.5, p = <0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Having a medical card increased the likelihood of being vaccinated, independent of age and need. The mismatch between vaccination guidelines and reimbursement policy is creating unequal access to recommended services among high risk groups en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board (HRB/ICE/2012/12, HRB/RL/2013/16, HRB/RL/2013/7) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2015 Mc Hugh et al.; licensee BioMed Central 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Influenza vaccine en
dc.subject Coverage en
dc.subject Socioeconomic status en
dc.subject Elderly en
dc.subject Pneumococcal vaccination en
dc.subject Elderly outpatients en
dc.subject Self-report en
dc.subject Risk groups en
dc.title The influence of partial public reimbursement on vaccination uptake in the older population: a cross-sectional study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Sheena M. McHugh, Epidemiology & Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-420-5526 Email: s.mchugh@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 287448053
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Public Health en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Open Access articles licensed via CC-BY 4.0 with UCC affiliated authors. Uploaded Jan 2016. en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress s.mchugh@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 83


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© 2015 Mc Hugh et al.; licensee BioMed Central 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Mc Hugh et al.; licensee BioMed Central 2015. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
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