Chronic disease burden associated with overweight and obesity in Ireland: the effects of a small BMI reduction at population level

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Kearns, Karen
dc.contributor.author Dee, Anne
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Anthony P.
dc.contributor.author Doherty, Edel
dc.contributor.author Perry, Ivan J.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-03T11:18:12Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-03T11:18:12Z
dc.date.issued 2014-02-10
dc.identifier.citation KEARNS, K., DEE, A., FITZGERALD, A. P., DOHERTY, E. & PERRY, I. J. 2014. Chronic disease burden associated with overweight and obesity in Ireland: the effects of a small BMI reduction at population level. BMC Public Health, 14:143, 1-10. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-14-143 en
dc.identifier.volume 14 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2247
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1471-2458-14-143
dc.description.abstract Background: Overweight and obesity prevalence has risen dramatically in recent decades. While it is known that overweight and obesity is associated with a wide range of chronic diseases, the cumulative burden of chronic disease in the population associated with overweight and obesity is not well quantified. The aims of this paper were to examine the associations between BMI and chronic disease prevalence; to calculate Population Attributable Fractions (PAFs) associated with overweight and obesity; and to estimate the impact of a one unit reduction in BMI on the population prevalence of chronic disease. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of 10,364 adults aged ≥18 years from the Republic of Ireland National Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition (SLÁN 2007) was performed. Using binary regression, we examined the relationship between BMI and the selected chronic diseases. In further analyses, we calculated PAFs of selected chronic diseases attributable to overweight and obesity and we assessed the impact of a one unit reduction in BMI on the overall burden of chronic disease. Results: Overweight and obesity prevalence was higher in men (43.0% and 16.1%) compared to women (29.2% and 13.4%), respectively. The most prevalent chronic conditions were lower back pain, hypertension, and raised cholesterol. Prevalence of chronic disease generally increased with increasing BMI. Compared to normal weight persons, the strongest associations were found in obese women for diabetes (RR 3.9, 95% CI 2.5-6.3), followed by hypertension (RR 2.9, 95% CI 2.3-3.6); and in obese men for hypertension (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.6-2.7), followed by osteoarthritis (RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.2). Calculated PAFs indicated that a large proportion of chronic disease is attributable to increased BMI, most noticeably for diabetes in women (42%) and for hypertension in men (30%). Overall, a one unit decrease in BMI results in 26 and 28 fewer cases of chronic disease per 1,000 men and women, respectively. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity are major contributors to the burden of chronic disease in the population. The achievement of a relatively modest reduction in average BMI in the population has the potential to make a significant impact on the burden of chronic disease. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © Kearns et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. en
dc.rights.uri http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0 en
dc.subject Overweight en
dc.subject Obesity en
dc.subject BMI en
dc.subject Burden en
dc.subject Chronic disease en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Population attributable fraction en
dc.title Chronic disease burden associated with overweight and obesity in Ireland: the effects of a small BMI reduction at population level en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Ivan Perry, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: i.perry@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Public Health en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress i.perry@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 143


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© Kearns et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Kearns et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement