What’s distressing about having type 1 diabetes? A qualitative study of young adults’ perspectives

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dc.contributor.author Balfe, Myles
dc.contributor.author Doyle, Frank
dc.contributor.author Smith, Diarmuid
dc.contributor.author Sreenan, Seamus
dc.contributor.author Brugha, Ruairí
dc.contributor.author Hevey, David
dc.contributor.author Conroy, Rónán M.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-08T16:55:37Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-08T16:55:37Z
dc.date.issued 2013-07-25
dc.identifier.citation BALFE, M., DOYLE, F., SMITH, D., SREENAN, S., BRUGHA, R., HEVEY, D. & CONROY, R. 2013. What’s distressing about having type 1 diabetes? A qualitative study of young adults’ perspectives. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 13:25, 1-14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6823-13-25 en
dc.identifier.volume 13 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 14 en
dc.identifier.issn 1472-6823
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2269
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1472-6823-13-25
dc.description.abstract Background: Diabetes distress is a general term that refers to the emotional burdens, anxieties, frustrations, stressors and worries that stem from managing a severe, complex condition like Type 1 diabetes. To date there has been limited research on diabetes-related distress in younger people with Type 1 diabetes. This qualitative study aimed to identify causes of diabetes distress in a sample of young adults with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 35 individuals with Type 1 diabetes (23–30 years of age). Results: This study found diabetes related-distress to be common in a sample of young adults with Type 1 diabetes in the second phase of young adulthood (23–30 years of age). Diabetes distress was triggered by multiple factors, the most common of which were: self-consciousness/stigma, day-to-day diabetes management difficulties, having to fight the healthcare system, concerns about the future and apprehension about pregnancy. A number of factors appeared to moderate distress in this group, including having opportunities to talk to healthcare professionals, attending diabetes education programmes and joining peer support groups. Young adults felt that having opportunities to talk to healthcare professionals about diabetes distress should be a component of standard diabetes care. Conclusions: Some aspects of living with diabetes frequently distress young adults with Type 1 diabetes who are in their twenties. Clinicians should facilitate young adults’ attendance at diabetes education programmes, provide them with opportunities to talk about their diabetes-related frustrations and difficulties and, where possible, assist in the development of peer-support networks for young adults with diabetes. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central Ltd. en
dc.rights © Balfe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0 en
dc.subject Young adult en
dc.subject Distress en
dc.subject Qualitative en
dc.subject Type 1 diabetes en
dc.subject Emerging adulthood en
dc.title What’s distressing about having type 1 diabetes? A qualitative study of young adults’ perspectives en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Myles Balfe, Department of Sociology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.balfe@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Diabetes Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Medical Research Charities Group, Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMC Endocrine Disorders en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.balfe@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 25


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© Balfe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © Balfe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013. This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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