Invading and expanding: range dynamics and ecological consequences of the greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) invasion in Ireland

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dc.contributor.author McDevitt, Allan D.
dc.contributor.author Montgomery, W. Ian
dc.contributor.author Tosh, David G.
dc.contributor.author Lusby, John
dc.contributor.author Reid, Neil
dc.contributor.author White, Thomas A.
dc.contributor.author McDevitt, C. Damien
dc.contributor.author O'Halloran, John
dc.contributor.author Searle, Jeremy B.
dc.contributor.author Yearsley, Jon M.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:43:40Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:43:40Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation McDevitt AD, Montgomery WI, Tosh DG, Lusby J, Reid N, White TA, et al. (2014) Invading and Expanding: Range Dynamics and Ecological Consequences of the Greater White-Toothed Shrew (Crocidura russula) Invasion in Ireland. PLoS ONE 9(6): e100403. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0100403
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 6 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2335
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0100403
dc.description.abstract Establishing how invasive species impact upon pre-existing species is a fundamental question in ecology and conservation biology. The greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) is an invasive species in Ireland that was first recorded in 2007 and which, according to initial data, may be limiting the abundance/distribution of the pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus), previously Ireland's only shrew species. Because of these concerns, we undertook an intensive live-trapping survey (and used other data from live-trapping, sightings and bird of prey pellets/nest inspections collected between 2006 and 2013) to model the distribution and expansion of C. russula in Ireland and its impacts on Ireland's small mammal community. The main distribution range of C. russula was found to be approximately 7,600 km 2 in 2013, with established outlier populations suggesting that the species is dispersing with human assistance within the island. The species is expanding rapidly for a small mammal, with a radial expansion rate of 5.5 km/yr overall (2008-2013), and independent estimates from live-trapping in 2012-2013 showing rates of 2.4-14.1 km/yr, 0.5-7.1 km/yr and 0-5.6 km/yr depending on the landscape features present. S. minutus is negatively associated with C. russula. S. minutus is completely absent at sites where C. russula is established and is only present at sites at the edge of and beyond the invasion range of C. russula. The speed of this invasion and the homogenous nature of the Irish landscape may mean that S. minutus has not had sufficient time to adapt to the sudden appearance of C. russula. This may mean the continued decline/disappearance of S. minutus as C. russula spreads throughout the island. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship; Embark Scholarship); Genetics Society, United Kingdom (Heredity Fieldwork Grant) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 McDevitt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Sorex minutus en
dc.subject Pygmy shrew en
dc.subject Interspecific competition en
dc.subject Clethrionomys glareolus en
dc.subject Habitat quality en
dc.subject Bufo marinus en
dc.subject Cane toads en
dc.subject Expansion en
dc.subject Dispersal en
dc.subject Evolution en
dc.title Invading and expanding: range dynamics and ecological consequences of the greater white-toothed shrew (Crocidura russula) invasion in Ireland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother John O'Halloran, Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.ohalloran@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000338917900048
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council
dc.contributor.funder Heritage Council, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Genetics Society, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.funder Vincent Wildlife Trust, United Kingdom
dc.contributor.funder Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and the Marine, Ireland
dc.contributor.funder Kerry County Council
dc.contributor.funder Cork County Council
dc.contributor.funder Galway County Council
dc.contributor.funder Northern Ireland Environment Agency
dc.contributor.funder Queen's University Belfast
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.ohalloran@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e100403


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© 2015 McDevitt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 McDevitt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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