Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a marine-derived bacillus strain for use as an in-feed probiotic for newly weaned pigs

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dc.contributor.author Prieto, Maria Luz
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Laurie
dc.contributor.author Tan, Shiau Pin
dc.contributor.author McLoughlin, Peter
dc.contributor.author Hughes, Helen
dc.contributor.author O'Donovan, Orla
dc.contributor.author Rea, Mary C.
dc.contributor.author Kent, Robert M.
dc.contributor.author Cassidy, Joseph P.
dc.contributor.author Gardiner, Gillian E.
dc.contributor.author Lawlor, Peadar G.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:44:40Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:44:40Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Prieto ML, O'Sullivan L, Tan SP, McLoughlin P, Hughes H, O'Donovan O, et al. (2014) Evaluation of the Efficacy and Safety of a Marine-Derived Bacillus Strain for Use as an In-Feed Probiotic for Newly Weaned Pigs. PLoS ONE 9(2): e88599. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088599
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2341
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0088599
dc.description.abstract Forty eight individual pigs (8.7 ± 0.26 kg) weaned at 28 ± 1 d of age were used in a 22-d study to evaluate the effect of oral administration of a Bacillus pumilus spore suspension on growth performance and health indicators. Treatments (n = 16) were: (1) non-medicated diet; (2) medicated diet with apramycin (200 mg/kg) and pharmacological levels of zinc oxide (2,500 mg zinc/kg) and (3) B. pumilus diet (non-medicated diet + 10(10) spores/day B. pumilus). Final body weight and average daily gain tended to be lower (P = 0.07) and feed conversion ratio was worsened (P<0.05) for the medicated treatment compared to the B. pumilus treatment. Ileal E. coli counts were lower for the B. pumilus and medicated treatments compared to the non-medicated treatment (P<0.05), perhaps as a result of increased ileal propionic acid concentrations (P<0.001). However, the medicated treatment reduced fecal (P<0.001) and cecal (P<0.05) Lactobacillus counts and tended to reduce the total cecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration (P = 0.10). Liver weights were lighter and concentrations of liver enzymes higher (P<0.05) in pigs on the medicated treatment compared to those on the non-medicated or B. pumilus treatments. Pigs on the B. pumilus treatment had lower overall lymphocyte and higher granulocyte percentages (P<0.001) and higher numbers of jejunal goblet cells (P<0.01) than pigs on either of the other two treatments or the non-medicated treatment, respectively. However, histopathological examination of the small intestine, kidneys and liver revealed no abnormalities. Overall, the B. pumilus treatment decreased ileal E. coli counts in a manner similar to the medicated treatment but without the adverse effects on growth performance, Lactobacillus counts, cecal SCFA concentration and possible liver toxicity experienced with the medicated treatment. en
dc.description.sponsorship Higher Education Authority / Institutes of Technology Ireland (Technological Sector Research Strand III Programme) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 Prieto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Cereus var. toyoi en
dc.subject Dietary zinc oxide en
dc.subject Escherichia coli en
dc.subject Piglets en
dc.subject Diarrhea en
dc.subject Bacteria en
dc.subject Growth en
dc.subject Acid en
dc.subject Combination en
dc.subject Performance en
dc.title Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a marine-derived bacillus strain for use as an in-feed probiotic for newly weaned pigs en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Mary Rea, APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: mary.rea@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000332389000015
dc.contributor.funder Higher Education Authority
dc.contributor.funder Institutes of Technology Ireland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.identifier.articleid e88599


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© 2015 Prieto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Prieto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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