Vitamin D binding protein genotype is associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH concentrations, as well as bone health in children and adolescents in Finland

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dc.contributor.author Pekkinen, Minna
dc.contributor.author Saarnio, Elisa
dc.contributor.author Viljakainen, Heli T.
dc.contributor.author Kokkonen, Elina
dc.contributor.author Jakobsen, Jette
dc.contributor.author Cashman, Kevin D. en
dc.contributor.author Makitie, Outi
dc.contributor.author Lamberg-Allardt, Christel
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:44:41Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:44:41Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.citation Pekkinen M, Saarnio E, Viljakainen HT, Kokkonen E, Jakobsen J, Cashman K, et al. (2014) Vitamin D Binding Protein Genotype Is Associated with Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and PTH Concentrations, as Well as Bone Health in Children and Adolescents in Finland. PLoS ONE 9(1): e87292. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0087292
dc.identifier.volume 9 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2344
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0087292
dc.description.abstract Vitamin D binding protein (DBP)/group-specific component (Gc), correlates positively with serum vitamin D metabolites, and phenotype influences serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D) concentration. The protein isoform has been associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. We examined the role of GC genotypes in S-25(OH)D status and BMD in 231 Finnish children and adolescents aged 7-19 yr. BMD was measured with DXA from lumbar spine (LS), total hip, and whole body, and for 175 subjects, radial volumetric BMD was measured with pQCT. Background characteristic and total dietary intakes of vitamin D and calcium were collected. The concentrations of 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium and other markers of calcium homeostasis were determined from blood and urine. Genotyping was based on single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs4588) in the GC gene. The genotype distribution was: GC 1/1 68%, GC 1/2 26% and GC 2/2 6%. A significant difference emerged in 25(OH)D and PTH concentrations between the genotypes, (p = 0.001 and 0.028 respectively, ANCOVA). There was also a linear trend in: Gc 2/2 had the lowest 25(OH) D and PTH concentrations (p = 0.025 and 0.012, respectively). Total hip bone mineral content was associated with GC genotype (BMC) (p = 0.05, ANCOVA) in boys. In regression analysis, after adjusting for relevant covariates, GC genotype was associated with LS BMC and strength and strain index (SSI) Z-score in both genders, and LS BMD in boys. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the association between GC genotypes and S-25(OH)D and PTH concentrations. The results show the influence of DBP genetic variation on bone mass accrual in adolescence. en
dc.description.sponsorship Helsinki University Hospital (Research Funds); University of Tampere, Finland (National Doctoral Programme of Musculoskeletal Disorders and Biomaterials) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 Pekkinen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Group-specific component en
dc.subject Mineral density en
dc.subject Gc globulin en
dc.subject Plasma concentrations en
dc.subject Fracture risk en
dc.subject Gene en
dc.subject Osteoporosis en
dc.subject Polymorphism en
dc.subject Phenotype en
dc.subject Growth en
dc.title Vitamin D binding protein genotype is associated with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and PTH concentrations, as well as bone health in children and adolescents in Finland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Kevin Cashman, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.cashman@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000330617100073
dc.contributor.funder Foundation for Pediatric Research, Finland
dc.contributor.funder Yrjö Jahnsson Foundation, Finland
dc.contributor.funder Academy of Finland
dc.contributor.funder Helsinki University Hospital, Finland
dc.contributor.funder Sigrid Juselius Foundation, Finland
dc.contributor.funder Ella and Georg Ehrnrooth Foundation, Finland
dc.contributor.funder University of Helsinki Research Foundation, Finland
dc.contributor.funder Maud Kuistila Memorial Foundation, Finland
dc.contributor.funder Folkhälsan Research Foundation, Finland
dc.contributor.funder University of Tampere, Finland
dc.contributor.funder Finnish Graduate School on Applied Biosciences, Finland
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.cashman@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e87292


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© 2015 Pekkinen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 Pekkinen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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