The prevalence and determinants of undiagnosed and diagnosed type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Irish adults

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dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Jennifer M.
dc.contributor.author Millar, Sean R.
dc.contributor.author Buckley, Claire M.
dc.contributor.author Kearney, Patricia M.
dc.contributor.author Perry, Ivan J.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:44:42Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:44:42Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation O Connor JM, Millar SR, Buckley CM, Kearney PM, Perry IJ (2013) The Prevalence and Determinants of Undiagnosed and Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes in Middle-Aged Irish Adults. PLoS ONE 8(11): e80504. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0080504
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.issued 11 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2353
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0080504
dc.description.abstract Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes within the Republic of Ireland is poorly defined, although a recent report suggested 135,000 cases in adults aged 45+, with approximately one-third of these undiagnosed. This study aims to assess the prevalence of undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes in middle-aged adults, and compare features related to either condition, in order to investigate why certain individuals remain undetected. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving a sample of 2,047 men and women, aged between 50-69 years, randomly selected from a large primary care centre. Univariate logistic regression was used to explore socio-economic, metabolic and other health related variable associations with undiagnosed or diagnosed diabetes. A final multivariate analysis was used to determine odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for having undiagnosed compared to diagnosed diabetes, adjusted for gender, age and significant covariates determined from univariate models. Principle Findings: The total prevalence of diabetes was 8.5% (95% CI: 7.4%-8.8%); 72 subjects (3.5%) had undiagnosed diabetes (95% CI: 2.8%-4.4%) and 102 subjects (5.0%) had diagnosed diabetes (95% CI: 4.1%-6.0%). Obesity, dyslipidaemia, and family history of diabetes were positively associated with both undiagnosed and diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Compared with diagnosed subjects, study participants with undiagnosed diabetes were significantly more likely to have low levels of physical activity and were less likely to be on treatment for diabetes-related conditions or to have private medical insurance. Conclusions: The prevalence of diabetes within the Cork and Kerry Diabetes and Heart Disease Study is comparable to recent estimates from the Slan National Health and Lifestyle Survey, a study which was nationally representative of the general population. A considerable proportion of diabetes cases were undiagnosed (41%), emphasising the need for more effective detection strategies and equitable access to primary healthcare. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board (HRC/2007/13) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2015 O'Connor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Fasting plasma glucose en
dc.subject US population en
dc.subject Self-reports en
dc.subject Health care en
dc.subject High risk en
dc.subject A1C en
dc.subject Hypertension en
dc.subject Agreement en
dc.subject Criteria en
dc.subject Individuals en
dc.title The prevalence and determinants of undiagnosed and diagnosed type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Irish adults en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Patricia Kearney, Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: patricia.kearney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000327543500049
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress patricia.kearney@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e80504


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© 2015 O'Connor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015 O'Connor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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