Targeting the microbiota to address diet-induced obesity: a time dependent challenge

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dc.contributor.author Clarke, Siobhan F.
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Eileen F.
dc.contributor.author O'Sullivan, Orla
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Paul W.
dc.contributor.author Shanahan, Fergus
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:45:33Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:45:33Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Clarke SF, Murphy EF, O’Sullivan O, Ross RP, O’Toole PW, Shanahan F, et al. (2013) Targeting the Microbiota to Address Diet-Induced Obesity: A Time Dependent Challenge. PLoS ONE 8(6): e65790. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065790 en
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.issued 6 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2375
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0065790
dc.description.abstract Links between the gut microbiota and host metabolism have provided new perspectives on obesity. We previously showed that the link between the microbiota and fat deposition is age-and time-dependent subject to microbial adaptation to diet over time. We also demonstrated reduced weight gain in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice through manipulation of the gut microbiota with vancomycin or with the bacteriocin-producing probiotic Lactobacillus salivarius UCC118 (Bac(+)), with metabolic improvement achieved in DIO mice in receipt of vancomycin. However, two phases of weight gain were observed with effects most marked early in the intervention phase. Here, we compare the gut microbial populations at the early relative to the late stages of intervention using a high throughput sequencing-based analysis to understand the temporal relationship between the gut microbiota and obesity. This reveals several differences in microbiota composition over the intervening period. Vancomycin dramatically altered the gut microbiota composition, relative to controls, at the early stages of intervention after which time some recovery was evident. It was also revealed that Bac(+) treatment initially resulted in the presence of significantly higher proportions of Peptococcaceae and significantly lower proportions of Rikenellaceae and Porphyromonadaceae relative to the gut microbiota of L. salivarius UCC118 bacteriocin negative (Bac(-)) administered controls. These differences were no longer evident at the later time. The results highlight the resilience of the gut microbiota and suggest that interventions may need to be monitored and continually adjusted to ensure sustained modification of the gut microbiota. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (SFI Research Centre grant to the Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Principal Investigator (PI) awards); Teagasc; Alimentary Health Ltd. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2013 Clarke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Human gut microbiota en
dc.subject Intestinal microbiota en
dc.subject Antibiotic treatment en
dc.subject Generation en
dc.subject Resistance en
dc.subject Diversity en
dc.subject Capacity en
dc.subject Ecology en
dc.subject Impact en
dc.subject Trees en
dc.title Targeting the microbiota to address diet-induced obesity: a time dependent challenge en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul W. O'Toole, Microbiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: pwotoole@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000321094800072
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Teagasc en
dc.contributor.funder Alimentary Health Ltd, Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress pwotoole@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e65790


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© 2013 Clarke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013 Clarke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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