Staphylococcus lugdunensis cultured from the amniotic fluid at caesarean section

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dc.contributor.author Marchocki, Zbigniew
dc.contributor.author Collins, J. Kevin
dc.contributor.author Lehane, Eimear
dc.contributor.author O'Reilly, Paddy
dc.contributor.author O'Donoghue, Keelin
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-17T11:46:20Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T11:46:20Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Marchocki Z, Collins K, Lehane E, Reilly PO, O'Donoghue K (2013) Staphylococcus lugdunensis Cultured from the Amniotic Fluid at Caesarean Section. PLoS ONE 8(2): e56373. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056373 en
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.issued 2 en
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2393
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0056373
dc.description.abstract Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a virulent coagulase-negative staphylococcus. It behaves like and can be mistaken in culture for Staphylococcus aureus. While originally thought to be a skin commensal rarely responsible for opportunistic infection, it was rapidly established as a significant human pathogen. It has been mainly associated with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and skin and soft tissue cellulitis, but has also been reported as a cause of fasciitis as well as peritonitis. Staphylococcus lugdunensis has been reported as a cause of endometritis but has not been previously isolated from amniotic fluid. Here, amniotic fluid samples were collected in the course of a larger study on amniotic fluid bacteriology, with prior ethical approval and informed patient consent. Amniotic fluid was obtained at Caesarean Section by direct needle aspiration from the intact amnion. Analysis with Staphylococcal API test kits led to identification of Staphylococcus lugdunensis in two cases. The clinical significance of the finding in these reported cases is undetermined. Staphylococcus lugdunensis has been shown to be a cause of serious and potentially fatal morbidities, but this is the first report of its culture from amniotic fluid. As caesarean delivery is accepted as the single most important factor associated with post-partum infectious complications in both mother and neonate, the identification of this pathogen is a new concern. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en
dc.rights © 2013 Marchocki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Staphylococcus lugdunensis en
dc.subject Amniotic fluid en
dc.subject Cesarean section en
dc.subject Bacterial colonization en
dc.subject Bacterium culture en
dc.subject Bacterium identification en
dc.subject Colony forming unit en
dc.subject Fine needle aspiration biopsy en
dc.subject Fatality en
dc.title Staphylococcus lugdunensis cultured from the amniotic fluid at caesarean section en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Keelin O'Donoghue, Anu Research Centre, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.odonoghue@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.wokid WOS:000315157200134
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle PLOS ONE en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.odonoghue@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid e56373


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© 2013 Marchocki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013 Marchocki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
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