Quantifying displaced carbon dioxide emissions from electric vehicles in Ireland

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dc.contributor.author Foley, Aoife M.
dc.contributor.author Leahy, Paul G.
dc.contributor.author McKeogh, Eamon J.
dc.contributor.author Ó Gallachóir, Brian P.
dc.contributor.editor Ghosh, Bidisha
dc.contributor.editor Murray, Roisin
dc.date.accessioned 2011-03-28T14:07:28Z
dc.date.available 2011-03-28T14:07:28Z
dc.date.copyright 2010
dc.date.issued 2010-09
dc.identifier.citation Foley, A. M. Leahy, P. G., McKeogh, E. J., Ó Gallachóir, B. P. 2010. Quantifying Displaced CO2 Emissions from Electric Vehicles in Ireland. In: Ghosh, B., Murray, R. (eds), Irish Transport Research Network: Proceedings of the inaugural conference of the Irish Transport Research Network (ITRN 2010). Dublin, Ireland 31 Aug - 1 Sep 2010. ITRN: Dublin. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/262
dc.description.abstract Under EU Directive 2009/28/EC on Renewable Energy each Member State is mandated to ensure that 10% of transport energy (excluding aviation and marine transport) comes from renewable sources by 2020. The Irish Government intends to achieve this target with a number of policies including an increase in the use of biofuels in transport by 3% by 2010 and ensuring that 10% of all vehicles in the transport fleet are powered by electricity by 2020. Electric vehicles (EVs) do not emit exhaust fumes in the same manner as traditional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. The optimal benefits of EVs can only be truly achieved if EVs are deployed effectively, so that exhaust pipe gaseous emissions are not fully displaced to the electricity sector. This paper examines the potential contributions that Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicles can make in reducing carbon dioxide. The paper presents the results of the generation expansion model for Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland built using the dynamic programming based long term generation expansion planning tool called the Wien Automatic System Planning IV tool. The model optimizes power dispatch using hourly electricity demand curves for each year up to 2020, while incorporating generator characteristics and certain operational requirements such as energy not served and loss of load probability while satisfying constraints on environmental emissions, fuel availability and generator operational and maintenance costs. In order to simulate the effect of PHEV, two distinct charging scenarios are applied based on a peak tariff and an off peak tariff. The importance and influence of the charging regime on the amount of energy used and gaseous emissions displaced is determined and briefly discussed. en
dc.description.sponsorship Environmental Protection Agency (EPA Climate Change Research Program (CCRP)) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Irish Transport Research Network en
dc.relation.ispartof Irish Transport Research Network: Proceedings of the inaugural conference of the Irish Transport Research Network (ITRN 2010), University College Dublin, Dublin. 31 Aug - 1 Sep 2010
dc.rights ©2010, Aoife M. Foley; Paul G. Leahy; Eamon J. McKeogh; Brian P. Ó Gallachóir. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ en
dc.subject Modelling en
dc.subject Smarter travel en
dc.subject Gaseous emissions en
dc.subject Power system en
dc.subject.lcsh Electric automobiles en
dc.subject.lcsh Transportation--Environmental aspects en
dc.subject.lcsh Greenhouse gas mitigation--Ireland en
dc.subject.lcsh Power resources en
dc.subject.lcsh Electric vehicles en
dc.title Quantifying displaced carbon dioxide emissions from electric vehicles in Ireland en
dc.type Conference item en
dc.internal.authorurl http://publish.ucc.ie/researchprofiles/D012/aoifefoley en
dc.internal.authorurl http://publish.ucc.ie/researchprofiles/D012/paulleahy en
dc.internal.authorurl http://publish.ucc.ie/researchprofiles/D012/emckeogh en
dc.internal.authorurl http://publish.ucc.ie/researchprofiles/D012/bogallachoir en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Brian O Gallachoir, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: b.ogallachoir@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Aoife Foley, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: aoife.foley@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul Leahy, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: paul.leahy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Eamon McKeogh, Civil Engineering, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: e.mckeogh@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2011-03-28T10:48:34Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 59434554
dc.contributor.funder Environmental Protection Agency en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked 16 March 2011, reply from Dr Aoife Ahern, UCD granting permission for paper to be archived. Copyright remains with the authors. en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress b.ogallachoir@ucc.ie en


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©2010, Aoife M. Foley; Paul G. Leahy; Eamon J. McKeogh; Brian P. Ó Gallachóir. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as ©2010, Aoife M. Foley; Paul G. Leahy; Eamon J. McKeogh; Brian P. Ó Gallachóir.
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