Molecular epidemiology of sexually transmitted human papillomavirus in a self referred group of women in Ireland

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dc.contributor.author Menton, John F.
dc.contributor.author Cremin, Suzanne M.
dc.contributor.author Canier, Lydie
dc.contributor.author Horgan, Mary
dc.contributor.author Fanning, Liam J.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-17T13:23:34Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-17T13:23:34Z
dc.date.issued 2009-07-23
dc.identifier.citation Menton, J. F., Cremin, S. M. ,Canier, L., Horgan, M. and Fanning, L. J. (2009) 'Molecular epidemiology of sexually transmitted human papillomavirus in a self referred group of women in Ireland'. Virology Journal, 6 . http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1743-422X-6-112 en
dc.identifier.volume 6 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 6 en
dc.identifier.issn 1743-422X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2754
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1743-422X-6-112
dc.description.abstract Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and external genital warts. The purpose of this study is to document the genotype distribution of HPV in females aged between 18 and 34 who self-referred to an STI clinic with visible external genital warts (EGW). Scrapings were taken from visible external genital warts (EGW). These scrapings were analysed by PCR for the presence of HPV DNA. Positive samples were then genotyped by means of a commercially available assay (LiPA). A comparison of genotyping results determined by the LiPA assay and direct amplicon DNA sequencing was also performed. Results: Ninety-two patients out of 105 samples (88%) had detectable levels of HPV DNA. The majority of individuals with EGW (66%) showed the presence of two or more genotypes. The most common HPV genotypes present in the study population were HPV-6, HPV-11, HPV-16, HPV-18, HPV-33 and HPV-53. Potential effects of vaccination on HPV molecular epidemiology indicate that 40% of the patients could have been protected from the high risk genotypes HPV-16 and HPV-18.Conclusion: This is the first report of the molecular epidemiology of external genital warts in women aged between 18 and 34 from Ireland based on results from a LiPA assay. The study shows that most individuals are infected with multiple genotypes including those with high oncogenic potential and that the newly available HPV vaccines could have a significant impact on prevalence of the most common HPV genotypes in this study population. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Biomed Central en
dc.rights © 2009 Menton et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ en
dc.subject Cervical cancer en
dc.subject Particle vaccine en
dc.subject Genital warts en
dc.subject Classification en
dc.subject HPV en
dc.subject Efficacy en
dc.subject Type-18 en
dc.subject Lesions en
dc.subject Human papillomavirus en
dc.title Molecular epidemiology of sexually transmitted human papillomavirus in a self referred group of women in Ireland en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Liam J. Fanning, Medicine Department, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: l.fanning@ucc.ie Remove selected en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2013-01-18T15:04:32Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 43334730
dc.internal.wokid 000269328300001
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Virology Journal en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No. !!CORA!! Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress l.fanning@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 112


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© 2009 Menton et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2009 Menton et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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