Irish and Jordanian general student nurses’ attitudes towards people with mental illness (PWMI) and their relationship to cultural and religious beliefs

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dc.contributor.advisor McCarthy, Geraldine en
dc.contributor.author Saed, Azizeh
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-15T10:58:49Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-15T10:58:49Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.date.submitted 2016
dc.identifier.citation Saed, A. 2016. Irish and Jordanian general student nurses’ attitudes towards people with mental illness (PWMI) and their relationship to cultural and religious beliefs. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2888
dc.description.abstract Background Attitudes held and cultural and religious beliefs of general nursing students towards individuals with mental health problems are key factors that contribute to the quality of care provided. Negative attitudes towards mental illness and to individuals with mental health problems are held by the general public as well as health professionals. Negative attitudes towards people with mental illness have been reported to be associated with low quality of care, poor access to health care services and feelings of exclusion. Furthermore, culture has been reported to play a significant role in shaping people’s attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviours, but has been poorly investigated. Research has also found that religious beliefs and practices are associated with better recovery for individuals with mental illness and enhanced coping strategies and provide more meaning and purpose to thinking and actions. The literature indicated that both Ireland and Jordan lack baseline data of general nurses’ and general nursing students’ attitudes towards mental illness and associated cultural and religious beliefs. Aims: To measure general nursing students’ attitudes towards individuals with mental illness and their relationships to socio-demographic variables and cultural and religious beliefs. Method: A quantitative descriptive study was conducted (n=470). 185 students in Jordan and 285 students in Ireland participated, with a response rate of 86% and 73%, respectively. Data were collected using the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill instrument and a Cultural and Religious Beliefs Scale to People with Mental Illness constructed by the author. Results: Irish students reported more positive attitudes yet did not have strong cultural and religious beliefs compared to students from Jordan. Country of origin, considering a career in mental health nursing, knowing somebody with mental illness and cultural and religious beliefs were the most significant variables associated with students’ attitudes towards people with mental illness. In addition, students living in urban areas reported more positive attitudes to people with mental illness compared to those living in rural areas. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2016, Azizeh Saed. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Attitude en
dc.subject Mental en
dc.subject Cultural en
dc.subject Religious en
dc.subject Nursing student en
dc.subject Belief en
dc.title Irish and Jordanian general student nurses’ attitudes towards people with mental illness (PWMI) and their relationship to cultural and religious beliefs en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname Doctor of Nursing Practice en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info No embargo required en
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Nursing and Midwifery en
dc.check.type No Embargo Required
dc.check.reason No embargo required en
dc.check.opt-out Yes en
dc.thesis.opt-out true
dc.check.embargoformat Not applicable en
dc.internal.conferring Autumn 2016 en


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© 2016, Azizeh Saed. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Azizeh Saed.
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