Single particle diversity and mixing state measurements

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Healy, Robert M.
dc.contributor.author Riemer, Nicole
dc.contributor.author Wenger, John C.
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Michael
dc.contributor.author West, M.
dc.contributor.author Poulain, Laurent
dc.contributor.author Wiedensohler, Alfred
dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Ian P.
dc.contributor.author McGillicuddy, Eoin
dc.contributor.author Sodeau, John R.
dc.contributor.author Evans, Greg J.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-27T14:57:13Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-27T14:57:13Z
dc.date.issued 2014-02-14
dc.identifier.citation Healy, R.M., Riemer, N., Wenger, J.C., Murphy, M., West, M., Poulain, L., Wiedensohler, A., O'Connor, I.P., McGillicuddy, E., Sodeau, J.R. and Evans, G. J. (2014) 'Single particle diversity and mixing state measurements', Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 14, pp. 3973–4005. doi:10.5194/acpd-14-3973-2014 en
dc.identifier.volume 14 en
dc.identifier.startpage 3973 en
dc.identifier.endpage 4005 en
dc.identifier.issn 1680-7367
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/2945
dc.identifier.doi 10.5194/acpd-14-3973-2014
dc.description.abstract A newly developed framework for quantifying aerosol particle diversity and mixing state based on information-theoretic entropy is applied for the first time to single particle mass spectrometry field data. Single particle mass fraction estimates for black carbon, organic aerosol, ammonium, nitrate and sulfate, derived using single particle mass spectrometer, aerosol mass spectrometer and multi-angle absorption photometer measurements are used to calculate single particle species diversity (Di). The average single particle species diversity (Dα) is then related to the species diversity of the bulk population (Dγ) to derive a mixing state index value (χ) at hourly resolution. The mixing state index is a single parameter representation of how internally/externally mixed a particle population is at a given time. The index describes a continuum, with values of 0 and 100% representing fully external and internal mixing, respectively. This framework was applied to data collected as part of the MEGAPOLI winter campaign in Paris, France, 2010. Di values are low (∼ 2) for fresh traffic and wood-burning particles that contain high mass fractions of black carbon and organic aerosol but low mass fractions of inorganic ions. Conversely, Di values are higher (∼ 4) for aged carbonaceous particles containing similar mass fractions of black carbon, organic aerosol, ammonium, nitrate and sulfate. Aerosol in Paris is estimated to be 59% internally mixed in the size range 150-1067 nm, and mixing state is dependent both upon time of day and air mass origin. Daytime primary emissions associated with vehicular traffic and wood-burning result in low χ values, while enhanced condensation of ammonium nitrate on existing particles at night leads to higher χ values. Advection of particles from continental Europe containing ammonium, nitrate and sulfate leads to increases in Dα, Dγ and χ. The mixing state index represents a useful metric by which to compare and contrast ambient particle mixing state at other locations globally. en
dc.description.sponsorship Higher Education Authority Ireland (PRTLI Cycle IV); European Commission (Seventh Framework Programme FP/2007–2011 MEGAPOLI; Marie Curie Action FP7-25 PEOPLE-IOF-2011, Project: CHEMBC, Number 299755); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, United States (Grant Number 835042) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) en
dc.rights © 2014, the Authors. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ en
dc.subject Aerosol en
dc.subject Ammonium en
dc.subject Black carbon en
dc.subject Measurement method en
dc.subject Mixing en
dc.subject Nitrate en
dc.subject Sulfate en
dc.title Single particle diversity and mixing state measurements en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Robert Healy, Chemistry, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: robert.healy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2014-06-06T14:14:27Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 246626171
dc.contributor.funder Higher Education Authority en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology en
dc.contributor.funder European Commission
dc.contributor.funder U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, United States
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress robert.healy@ucc.ie en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2014, the Authors. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014, the Authors. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement