Catabolic flexibility of mammalian-associated lactobacilli

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dc.contributor.author O'Donnell, Michelle M.
dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Paul W.
dc.contributor.author Ross, R. Paul
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-31T15:07:16Z
dc.date.available 2016-08-31T15:07:16Z
dc.date.issued 2013-05-16
dc.identifier.citation O'Donnell, M. M., O'Toole, P. W. and Ross, R. P. (2013) 'Catabolic flexibility of mammalian associated lactobacilli', Microbial Cell Factories, 12:48, http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1475-2859-12-48 en
dc.identifier.volume 12 en
dc.identifier.startpage 48-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 48-11 en
dc.identifier.issn 1475-2859
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3045
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1475-2859-12-48
dc.description.abstract Metabolic flexibility may be generally defined as “the capacity for the organism to adapt fuel oxidation to fuel availability”. The metabolic diversification strategies used by individual bacteria vary greatly from the use of novel or acquired enzymes to the use of plasmid-localised genes and transporters. In this review, we describe the ability of lactobacilli to utilise a variety of carbon sources from their current or new environments in order to grow and survive. The genus Lactobacillus now includes more than 150 species, many with adaptive capabilities, broad metabolic capacity and species/strain variance. They are therefore, an informative example of a cell factory capable of adapting to new niches with differing nutritional landscapes. Indeed, lactobacilli naturally colonise and grow in a wide variety of environmental niches which include the roots and foliage of plants, silage, various fermented foods and beverages, the human vagina and the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT; including the mouth, stomach, small intestine and large intestine). Here we primarily describe the metabolic flexibility of some lactobacilli isolated from the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and we also describe some of the food-associated species with a proven ability to adapt to the GIT. As examples this review concentrates on the following species - Lb. plantarum, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. ruminis, Lb. salivarius, Lb. reuteri and Lb. sakei, to highlight the diversity and inter-relationships between the catabolic nature of species within the genus. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.rights © 2013 O’Donnell et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en
dc.subject Catabolic flexibility en
dc.subject Lactobacilli en
dc.subject Mammalian gastrointestinal tract en
dc.subject Bacteria en
dc.subject Metabolic flexibility en
dc.title Catabolic flexibility of mammalian-associated lactobacilli en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorurl http://research.ucc.ie/profiles/D010/pwotoole en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Paul O'Toole, Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. Email: pwotoole@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Microbial Cell Factories en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress pwotoole@ucc.ie en


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© 2013 O’Donnell et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013 O’Donnell et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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