Bacteria and tumours: causative agents or opportunistic inhabitants?

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dc.contributor.author Cummins, Joanne
dc.contributor.author Tangney, Mark
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-01T08:23:47Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-01T08:23:47Z
dc.date.issued 2013-03-28
dc.identifier.citation Cummins, J. and Tangey, M. (2008) 'Bacteria and tumours: causative agents or opportunistic inhabitants?', Infectious Agents and Cancer, 8:11, http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1750-9378-8-11 en
dc.identifier.volume 8 en
dc.identifier.startpage 11-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 11-8 en
dc.identifier.issn 1750-9378
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3047
dc.identifier.doi 10.1186/1750-9378-8-11
dc.description.abstract Associations between different bacteria and various tumours have been reported in patients for decades. Studies involving characterisation of bacteria within tumour tissues have traditionally been in the context of tumourigenesis as a result of bacterial presence within healthy tissues, and in general, dogma holds that such bacteria are causative agents of malignancy (directly or indirectly). While evidence suggests that this may be the case for certain tumour types and bacterial species, it is plausible that in many cases, clinical observations of bacteria within tumours arise from spontaneous infection of established tumours. Indeed, growth of bacteria specifically within tumours following deliberate systemic administration has been demonstrated for numerous bacterial species at preclinical and clinical levels. We present the available data on links between bacteria and tumours, and propose that besides the few instances in which pathogens are playing a pathogenic role in cancer, in many instances, the prevalent relationship between solid tumours and bacteria is opportunistic rather than causative, and discuss opportunities for exploiting tumour-specific bacterial growth for cancer treatment. en
dc.description.sponsorship Health Research Board (grants HRA_POR/2012/99 and HRA_POR/2010/138); European Commission (Seventh Framework Program grant PIOF-GA-2009-255466.) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BioMed Central en
dc.rights © 2013 Cummins and Tangney; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 en
dc.subject Cancer en
dc.subject Tumours en
dc.subject Pathogens en
dc.subject Bacteria en
dc.subject Tumour-specific bacterial growth en
dc.title Bacteria and tumours: causative agents or opportunistic inhabitants? en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Mark Tangney, Cork Cancer Research Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.tangney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Infectious Agents and Cancer en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.tangney@ucc.ie en


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© 2013 Cummins and Tangney; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2013 Cummins and Tangney; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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