Assessing charge contribution from thermally treated Ni foam as current collectors for Li-ion batteries

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dc.contributor.author Geaney, Hugh
dc.contributor.author McNulty, David
dc.contributor.author O'Connell, John
dc.contributor.author Holmes, Justin D.
dc.contributor.author O'Dwyer, Colm
dc.date.accessioned 2016-09-30T08:56:13Z
dc.date.available 2016-09-30T08:56:13Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-22
dc.identifier.citation Geaney, H., McNulty, D., O'Connell, J., Holmes, J. D. & O'Dwyer, C. (2016) ‘Assessing charge contribution from thermally treated Ni Foam as current collectors for Li-ion batteries’, Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 163(8), pp. A1805-A1811. doi: 10.1149/2.0071609jes en
dc.identifier.volume 163 en
dc.identifier.issued 8 en
dc.identifier.startpage A1805 en
dc.identifier.endpage A1811 en
dc.identifier.issn 0013-4651
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3138
dc.identifier.doi 10.1149/2.0071609jes
dc.description.abstract In this report we have investigated the use of Ni foam substrates as anode current collectors for Li-ion batteries. As the majority of reports in the literature focus on hydrothermal formation of materials on Ni foam followed by a high temperature anneal/oxidation step, we probed the fundamental electrochemical responses of as received Ni foam substrates and those subjected to heating at 100°C, 300°C and 450°C. Through cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic testing, it is shown that the as received and 100°C annealed Ni foam show negligible electrochemical activity. However, Ni foams heated to higher temperature showed substantial electrochemical contributions which may lead to inflated capacities and incorrect interpretations of CV responses for samples subjected to high temperature anneals. XRD, XPS and SEM analyses clearly illustrate that the formation of electrochemically active NiO nanoparticles on the surface of the foam is responsible for this behavior. To further investigate the contribution of the oxidized Ni foam to the overall electrochemical response, we formed Co3O4 nanoflowers directly on Ni foam at 450°C and showed that the resulting electrochemical response was dominated by NiO after the first 10 charge/discharge cycles. This report highlights the importance of assessing current collector activity for active materials grown on transition metal foam current collectors for Li-ion applications. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (SFI Technology Innovation and Development Awards contract no. 13/TIDA/E2761, SFI grant Number 14/IA/2581.); European Commission (EU Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 (Project STABLE) grant agreement no. 314508) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Electrochemical Society en
dc.relation.uri http://jes.ecsdl.org/content/current
dc.rights © The Author(s) 2016. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email: oa@electrochem.org. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Batteries and energy storage en
dc.subject Lithium-ion batteries en
dc.subject Cyclic voltammetry en
dc.subject Electric batteries en
dc.subject Electric current collectors en
dc.subject Foams en
dc.subject Ions en
dc.subject NiO nanoparticles en
dc.subject Hydrothermal formations en
dc.subject High-temperature anneals en
dc.subject Electrochemical response en
dc.subject Electrochemical activities en
dc.subject Current collector en
dc.subject Lithium en
dc.subject Charge/discharge cycle en
dc.title Assessing charge contribution from thermally treated Ni foam as current collectors for Li-ion batteries en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Justin D. Holmes, Chemistry, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.holmes@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2016-09-26T10:01:39Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 355156676
dc.internal.rssid 353120185
dc.internal.rssid 353120185
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of the Electrochemical Society en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No. !!CORA!! Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.holmes@ucc.ie en


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© The Author(s) 2016. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email: oa@electrochem.org. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2016. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email: oa@electrochem.org.
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