Socioeconomic inequalities of cardiovascular risk factors among manufacturing employees in the Republic of Ireland: a cross-sectional study

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dc.contributor.author Tracey, Marsha L.
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Geaney, Fiona
dc.contributor.author Perry, Ivan J.
dc.contributor.author Greiner, Birgit A.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-04T08:54:11Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-04T08:54:11Z
dc.date.issued 2015-08-13
dc.identifier.citation Tracey, M. L., Fitzgerald, S., Geaney, F., Perry, I. J. and Greiner, B. (2015) ‘Socioeconomic inequalities of cardiovascular risk factors among manufacturing employees in the Republic of Ireland: a cross-sectional study’, Preventive Medicine Reports, 2, pp. 699–703. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.08.003 en
dc.identifier.volume 2 en
dc.identifier.startpage 699 en
dc.identifier.endpage 703 en
dc.identifier.issn 2211-3355
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3151
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.08.003
dc.description.abstract Objectives: To explore socioeconomic differences in four cardiovascular disease risk factors (overweight/obesity, smoking, hypertension, height) among manufacturing employees in the Republic of Ireland (ROI). Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 850 manufacturing employees aged 18–64 years. Education and job position served as socioeconomic indicators. Group-specific differences in prevalence were assessed with the Chi-squared test. Multivariate regression models were explored if education and job position were independent predictors of the CVD risk factors. Cochran–Armitage test for trend was used to assess the presence of a social gradient. Results: A social gradient was found across educational levels for smoking and height. Employees with the highest education were less likely to smoke compared to the least educated employees (OR 0.2, [95% CI 0.1–0.4]; p b 0.001). Lower educational attainment was associated with a reduction in mean height. Non-linear differences were found in both educational level and job position for obesity/overweight. Managers were more than twice as likely to be overweight or obese relative to those employees in the lowest job position (OR 2.4 [95% CI 1.3–4.6]; p = 0.008). Conclusion: Socioeconomic inequalities in height, smoking and overweight/obesity were highlighted within a sub-section of the working population in ROI. en
dc.description.sponsorship HRB (Centre for Health and Diet Research Grant HRC2007/13); Irish Heart Foundation (Student bursaries) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Inc. en
dc.rights © 2015, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Cross-sectional study en
dc.subject Social gradient of health en
dc.subject Education en
dc.subject Job position en
dc.subject Occupation en
dc.subject Cardiovascular risk factors en
dc.title Socioeconomic inequalities of cardiovascular risk factors among manufacturing employees in the Republic of Ireland: a cross-sectional study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Marsha Tracey, Epidemiology and Public Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.treacy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder Irish Heart Foundation
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Preventive Medicine Reports en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.treacy@ucc.ie
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.treacy@ucc.ie en


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© 2015, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015, the Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
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