Complexity as key to designing cognitive-friendly environments for older people

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Cassarino, Marica
dc.contributor.author Setti, Annalisa
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-05T11:01:48Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-05T11:01:48Z
dc.date.issued 2016-08-30
dc.identifier.citation Cassarino, M. and Setti, A. (2016) ‘Complexity as key to designing cognitive-friendly environments for older people’, Frontiers in Psychology, 7. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01329 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1329-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 1329-12 en
dc.identifier.issn 1664-1078
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3155
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01329
dc.description.abstract The lived environment is the arena where our cognitive skills, preferences, and attitudes come together to determine our ability to interact with the world. The mechanisms through which lived environments can benefit cognitive health in older age are yet to be fully understood. The existing literature suggests that environments which are perceived as stimulating, usable and aesthetically appealing can improve or facilitate cognitive performance both in young and older age. Importantly, optimal stimulation for cognition seems to depend on experiencing sufficiently stimulating environments while not too challenging. Environmental complexity is an important contributor to determining whether an environment provides such an optimal stimulation. The present paper reviews a selection of studies which have explored complexity in relation to perceptual load, environmental preference and perceived usability to propose a framework which explores direct and indirect environmental influences on cognition, and to understand these influences in relation to aging processes. We identify ways to define complexity at different environmental scales, going from micro low-level perceptual features of scenes, to design qualities of proximal environments (e.g., streets, neighborhoods), to broad geographical areas (i.e., natural vs. urban environments). We propose that studying complexity at these different scales will provide new insight into the design of cognitive-friendly environments. en
dc.description.sponsorship University College Cork (Strategic Research Fund Postgraduate Scholarship 2014) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.rights © 2016 Cassarino and Setti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original authors or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Aging en
dc.subject Environmental preference en
dc.subject Usability en
dc.subject Perceptual load en
dc.subject Cognition en
dc.subject Environmental complexity en
dc.title Complexity as key to designing cognitive-friendly environments for older people en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Psychology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress a.setti@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 1329


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2016 Cassarino and Setti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original authors or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 Cassarino and Setti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original authors or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement