Help-seeking behaviors and mental well-being of first year undergraduate university students

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dc.contributor.author Goodwin, John
dc.contributor.author Behan, Laura
dc.contributor.author Kelly, Peter
dc.contributor.author McCarthy, Karen
dc.contributor.author Horgan, Aine M.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-14T08:36:00Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-14T08:36:00Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-30
dc.identifier.citation Goodwin, J., Behan, L., Kelly, P., McCarthy, K. and Horgan, A. (2016) ‘Help-seeking behaviors and mental well-being of first year undergraduate university students’, Psychiatry Research, 246, pp.129-135. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2016.09.015 en
dc.identifier.volume 246
dc.identifier.startpage 129 en
dc.identifier.endpage 135 en
dc.identifier.issn 0165-1781
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3178
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.09.015
dc.description.abstract University students demonstrate poor help-seeking behaviors for their mental health, despite often reporting low levels of mental well-being. The aims of this study were to examine the help-seeking intentions and experiences of first year university students in terms of their mental well-being, and to explore these students’ views on formal (e.g. psychiatrists) and informal (e.g. friends) help-seeking. Students from a university in the Republic of Ireland (n=220) completed an online questionnaire which focused on mental well-being and help-seeking behaviors. Almost a third of students had sought help from a mental health professional. Very few students reported availing of university/online supports. Informal sources of help were more popular than formal sources, and those who would avail and had availed of informal sources demonstrated higher well-being scores. Counselors were the source of professional help most widely used. General practitioners, chaplains, social workers, and family therapists were rated the most helpful. Those with low/average well-being scores were less likely to seek help than those with higher scores. Findings indicate the importance of enhancing public knowledge of mental health issues, and for further examination of students’ knowledge of help-seeking resources in order to improve the help-seeking behaviors and mental well-being of this population group. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier Inc. en
dc.rights © 2016, Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Mental health en
dc.subject Students en
dc.subject Well-being en
dc.subject Help-seeking en
dc.title Help-seeking behaviors and mental well-being of first year undergraduate university students en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Aine Horgan, Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: aine.horgan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2017-09-16
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 421659436
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Psychiatry Research en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress aine.horgan@ucc.ie
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress aine.horgan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress john.goodwin@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress peter.kelly@ucc.ie en


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© 2016, Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
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