Nurses’ perceptions of nursing presence and the relationship between nursing presence and moral sensitivity in nurses working with people with dementia in residential care

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dc.contributor.advisor McCarthy, Geraldine en
dc.contributor.advisor Tyrrell, Mark en
dc.contributor.author Linehan, John
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-14T08:40:38Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.date.submitted 2014
dc.identifier.citation Linehan, J. 2014. Nurses’ perceptions of nursing presence and the relationship between nursing presence and moral sensitivity in nurses working with people with dementia in residential care. PhD Thesis, University College Cork. en
dc.identifier.endpage 263 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3179
dc.description.abstract Aim: The aim of this study was to measure nursing presence among nurses caring for people with dementia in residential care settings, and to investigate the relationship between nursing presence and moral sensitivity. Background: Nursing presence is a core relational skill in nursing and holds many benefits for nurses and their patients. Moral sensitivity is defined as how one recognises the moral elements of a situation, and how one’s moral or ethical decision making may impact on an individual. Methods: A descriptive, cross sectional quantitative methodology was used with a sample of 150 registered nurses. The Presence of Nursing Scale for Registered Nurses was used to investigate nursing presence, and the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire for moral sensitivity. Results: Findings from the study demonstrated that participants agreed with the majority of elements of nursing presence, (mean 76.97, SD= 7.51). A mean score of 36.22 was evidence of a well developed level of moral sensitivity in participants. Nurses who perceived themselves to be highly present to their patients also scored highest on certain elements of moral sensitivity such as moral strength. Nursing presence was also found to be more developed in those participants that rated themselves as having higher levels of expertise based on Benner’s (1984) definitions. Older nurses also scored higher on nursing presence. There was a high level of agreement that factors such as lack of time (n=133), and heavy workload influenced nursing presence. Nurses, who were older and had longer clinical experience, were shown to have greater moral strength. There were differences in elements of moral sensitivity between groups of nurses who ranked themselves according to Benner’s (1984) competence framework with higher scores evident in the more expert groups. Conclusion: Overall, this study showed that participants had a well developed level of nursing presence, and certain elements of moral sensitivity are positively related to nursing presence. Nursing presence appears to be linked to the level of expertise of the nurse but factors such as time and workload do influence nursing presence. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2014, John Linehan. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Nursing presence en
dc.subject Moral sensitivity en
dc.title Nurses’ perceptions of nursing presence and the relationship between nursing presence and moral sensitivity in nurses working with people with dementia in residential care en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral en
dc.type.qualificationname Doctor of Nursing Practice en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Indefinite en
dc.check.date 10000-01-01
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Nursing and Midwifery en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Not applicable en
dc.thesis.opt-out false
dc.check.entireThesis Entire Thesis Restricted
dc.check.embargoformat Both hard copy thesis and e-thesis en
ucc.workflow.supervisor g.mccarthy@ucc.ie
dc.internal.conferring Spring 2016 en


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© 2014, John Linehan. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2014, John Linehan.
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