Perceptual load affects eyewitness accuracy and susceptibility to leading questions

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Murphy, Gillian
dc.contributor.author Greene, Ciara M.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-24T15:41:07Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-24T15:41:07Z
dc.date.issued 2016-08-30
dc.identifier.citation Murphy, G. and Greene, C. M. (2016) ‘Perceptual load affects eyewitness accuracy and susceptibility to leading questions’, Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 1322. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01322 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.startpage 1322-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 1322-10 en
dc.identifier.issn 1664-1078
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3212
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01322
dc.description.abstract Load Theory (Lavie, 1995, 2005) states that the level of perceptual load in a task (i.e.,the amount of information involved in processing task-relevant stimuli) determines the efficiency of selective attention. There is evidence that perceptual load affects distractor processing, with increased inattentional blindness under high load. Given that high load can result in individuals failing to report seeing obvious objects, it is conceivable that load may also impair memory for the scene. The current study is the first to assess the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory. Across three experiments (two video-based and one in a driving simulator), the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory was assessed. The results showed that eyewitnesses were less accurate under high load, in particular for peripheral details. For example, memory for the central character in the video was not affected by load but memory for a witness who passed by the window at the edge of the scene was significantly worse under high load. High load memories were also more open to suggestion, showing increased susceptibility to leading questions. High visual perceptual load also affected recall for auditory information, illustrating a possible cross-modal perceptual load effect on memory accuracy. These results have implications for eyewitness memory researchers and forensic professionals. en
dc.description.sponsorship Irish Research Council (Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship (project ID GOIPG/2013/71)) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.rights © 2016 Murphy and Greene. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Perceptual load en
dc.subject Eyewitness memory en
dc.subject Attention Perception en
dc.subject Reconstructive memory en
dc.title Perceptual load affects eyewitness accuracy and susceptibility to leading questions en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Gillian Murphy, Applied Psychology University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. T: 021 490 4506. E: gillian.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 362154620
dc.contributor.funder Irish Research Council en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Psychology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress gillian.murphy@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 1322


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2016 Murphy and Greene. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 Murphy and Greene. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement