Human-Computer interaction methodologies applied in the evaluation of haptic digital musical instruments

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dc.contributor.advisor Murphy, David en
dc.contributor.advisor Weeter, Jeffrey en
dc.contributor.author Young, Gareth William
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-09T11:51:02Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.date.submitted 2016
dc.identifier.citation Young, G. W. 2016. Human-Computer interaction methodologies applied in the evaluation of haptic digital musical instruments. PhD Thesis, University College Cork en
dc.identifier.endpage 207 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3256
dc.description.abstract Recent developments in interactive technologies have seen major changes in the manner in which artists, performers, and creative individuals interact with digital music technology; this is due to the increasing variety of interactive technologies that are readily available today. Digital Musical Instruments (DMIs) present musicians with performance challenges that are unique to this form of computer music. One of the most significant deviations from conventional acoustic musical instruments is the level of physical feedback conveyed by the instrument to the user. Currently, new interfaces for musical expression are not designed to be as physically communicative as acoustic instruments. Specifically, DMIs are often void of haptic feedback and therefore lack the ability to impart important performance information to the user. Moreover, there currently is no standardised way to measure the effect of this lack of physical feedback. Best practice would expect that there should be a set of methods to effectively, repeatedly, and quantifiably evaluate the functionality, usability, and user experience of DMIs. Earlier theoretical and technological applications of haptics have tried to address device performance issues associated with the lack of feedback in DMI designs and it has been argued that the level of haptic feedback presented to a user can significantly affect the user’s overall emotive feeling towards a musical device. The outcome of the investigations contained within this thesis are intended to inform new haptic interface. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language English en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University College Cork en
dc.rights © 2016, Gareth William Young. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ en
dc.subject Haptics en
dc.subject Psychophysics en
dc.subject Digital musical instruments en
dc.subject Computer music en
dc.subject Sound and music computing en
dc.subject Musical instrument analysis en
dc.title Human-Computer interaction methodologies applied in the evaluation of haptic digital musical instruments en
dc.type Doctoral thesis en
dc.type.qualificationlevel Doctoral Degree (Structured) en
dc.type.qualificationname PhD (Arts) en
dc.internal.availability Full text not available en
dc.check.info Please note that Chapter 5 (pp.91-171) is unavailable due to a restriction requested by the author for one year. en
dc.check.date 2017-11-09T11:51:02Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version
dc.description.status Not peer reviewed en
dc.internal.school Computer Science en
dc.internal.school Music en
dc.check.reason This thesis is due for publication or the author is actively seeking to publish this material en
dc.check.opt-out Not applicable en
dc.thesis.opt-out false
dc.check.chapterOfThesis 5
dc.check.embargoformat E-thesis on CORA only en
ucc.workflow.supervisor d.murphy@cs.ucc.ie
dc.internal.conferring Autumn 2016 en


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© 2016, Gareth William Young. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Gareth William Young.
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