Bifidobacterium longum 1714 as a translational psychobiotic: modulation of stress, electrophysiology and neurocognition in healthy volunteers

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dc.contributor.author Allen, Andrew P.
dc.contributor.author Hutch, William
dc.contributor.author Borre, Yuliya E.
dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Paul J.
dc.contributor.author Temko, Andriy
dc.contributor.author Boylan, Geraldine B.
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Eileen F.
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-14T16:19:52Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-14T16:19:52Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-01
dc.identifier.citation Allen, A. P., W. Hutch, Y. E. Borre, P. J. Kennedy, A. Temko, G. Boylan, E. Murphy, J. F. Cryan, T. G. Dinan and G. Clarke (2016). "Bifidobacterium longum 1714 as a translational psychobiotic: modulation of stress, electrophysiology and neurocognition in healthy volunteers." Translational Psychiatry 6: e939. doi: 10.1038/tp.2016.191 en
dc.identifier.volume 6 en
dc.identifier.startpage e939-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage e939-7 en
dc.identifier.issn 2158-3188
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3275
dc.identifier.doi 10.1038/tp.2016.191
dc.description.abstract The emerging concept of psychobiotics—live microorganisms with a potential mental health benefit—represents a novel approach for the management of stress-related conditions. The majority of studies have focused on animal models. Recent preclinical studies have identified the B. longum 1714 strain as a putative psychobiotic with an impact on stress-related behaviors, physiology and cognitive performance. Whether such preclinical effects could be translated to healthy human volunteers remains unknown. We tested whether psychobiotic consumption could affect the stress response, cognition and brain activity patterns. In a within-participants design, healthy volunteers (N=22) completed cognitive assessments, resting electroencephalography and were exposed to a socially evaluated cold pressor test at baseline, post-placebo and post-psychobiotic. Increases in cortisol output and subjective anxiety in response to the socially evaluated cold pressor test were attenuated. Furthermore, daily reported stress was reduced by psychobiotic consumption. We also observed subtle improvements in hippocampus-dependent visuospatial memory performance, as well as enhanced frontal midline electroencephalographic mobility following psychobiotic consumption. These subtle but clear benefits are in line with the predicted impact from preclinical screening platforms. Our results indicate that consumption of B. longum 1714 is associated with reduced stress and improved memory. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the benefits of this putative psychobiotic in relevant stress-related conditions and to unravel the mechanisms underlying such effects. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Nature Publishing Group en
dc.rights © The Authors 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Psychobiotics en
dc.subject Stress management en
dc.subject B. longum 1714 en
dc.subject Bifidobacterium longum 1714 en
dc.subject Translational psychiatry en
dc.subject Translational psychobiotics en
dc.title Bifidobacterium longum 1714 as a translational psychobiotic: modulation of stress, electrophysiology and neurocognition in healthy volunteers en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Timothy G. Dinan, Psychiatry, University College Cork Cork, Ireland, +353 21 490 3000. E: t.dinan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Translational Psychiatry en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress t.dinan@ucc.ie en


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© The Authors 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Authors 2016. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
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