Measuring sperm backflow following female orgasm: a new method

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dc.contributor.author King, Robert J.
dc.contributor.author Dempsey, Maria
dc.contributor.author Valentine, Katherine A.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-22T16:35:48Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-22T16:35:48Z
dc.date.issued 2016-10-25
dc.identifier.citation King, Robert J.; Dempsey, Maria; Valentine, Katherine A. (2016) 'Measuring sperm backflow following female orgasm: a new method'. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology, (6):31927-1-3192-13. doi: 10.3402/snp.v6.31927 en
dc.identifier.issued 6 en
dc.identifier.startpage 31927-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 31927-13 en
dc.identifier.issn 2000-9011
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3306
dc.identifier.doi 10.3402/snp.v6.31927
dc.description.abstract Background: Human female orgasm is a vexed question in the field while there is credible evidence of cryptic female choice that has many hallmarks of orgasm in other species. Our initial goal was to produce a proof of concept for allowing females to study an aspect of infertility in a home setting, specifically by aligning the study of human infertility and increased fertility with the study of other mammalian fertility. In the latter case - the realm of oxytocin-mediated sperm retention mechanisms seems to be at work in terms of ultimate function (differential sperm retention) while the proximate function (rapid transport or cervical tenting) remains unresolved. Method: A repeated measures design using an easily taught technique in a natural setting was used. Participants were a small (n=6), non-representative sample of females. The introduction of a sperm-simulant combined with an orgasm-producing technique using a vibrator/home massager and other easily supplied materials. Results: The sperm flowback (simulated) was measured using a technique that can be used in a home setting. There was a significant difference in simulant retention between the orgasm (M=4.08, SD=0.17) and non-orgasm (M=3.30, SD=0.22) conditions; t (5)=7.02, p=0.001. Cohen’s d=3.97, effect size r=0.89. This indicates a medium to small effect size. Conclusions: This method could allow females to test an aspect of sexual response that has been linked to lowered fertility in a home setting with minimal training. It needs to be replicated with a larger sample size. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Co-Action Publishing en
dc.relation.uri http://www.socioaffectiveneuroscipsychol.net/index.php/snp/article/view/31927
dc.rights © 2016 Robert King et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Female orgasm en
dc.subject Evolution en
dc.subject Insuck en
dc.subject Sperm retention en
dc.subject Fertility en
dc.title Measuring sperm backflow following female orgasm: a new method en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Robert King, Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: r.king@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2016-11-22T16:27:57Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 372855425
dc.internal.rssid 369668676
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress r.king@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.dempsey@ucc.ie en
dc.identifier.articleid 31927


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© 2016 Robert King et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 Robert King et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, allowing third parties to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format and to remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially, provided the original work is properly cited and states its license.
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