Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis in family units living in the United States

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dc.contributor.author Scanlan, Pauline D.
dc.contributor.author Knight, Rob
dc.contributor.author Song, Se Jin
dc.contributor.author Ackermann, Gail
dc.contributor.author Cotter, Paul D.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-23T10:29:03Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-23T10:29:03Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11
dc.identifier.citation Scanlan, Pauline D.; Knight, Rob; Song, Se Jin; Ackermann, Gail; Cotter, Paul D. (2016) 'Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis in family units living in the United States'. Infection Genetics And Evolution, 45 :95-97.:10.1016/j.meegid.2016.08.018 en
dc.identifier.volume 45 en
dc.identifier.startpage 95 en
dc.identifier.endpage 97 en
dc.identifier.issn 1567-1348
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3308
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.meegid.2016.08.018
dc.description.abstract The human gut is host to a diversity of microorganisms including the single-celled microbial eukaryote Blastocystis. Although Blastocystis has a global distribution, there is dearth of information relating to its prevalence and diversity in many human populations. The mode of Blastocystis transmission to humans is also insufficiently characterised, however, it is speculated to vary between different populations. Here we investigated the incidence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis in a US population and also the possibility of Blastocystis human-human transmission between healthy individuals using family units (N = 50) living in Boulder, Colorado as our sample-set. Ten of the 139 (~ 7%) individuals in our dataset were positive for Blastocystis, nine of whom were adults and one individual belonging to the children/adolescents group. All positive cases were present in different family units. A number of different Blastocystis subtypes (species) were detected with no evidence of mixed infections. The prevalence of Blastocystis in this subset of the US population is comparatively low relative to other industrialised populations investigated to date; however, subtype diversity was largely consistent with that previously reported in studies of European populations. The distribution of Blastocystis within family units indicates that human-human transmission is unlikely to have occurred within families that participated in this study. It is not unexpected that given the world-wide variation in human living conditions and lifestyles between different populations, both the prevalence of Blastocystis and its mode of transmission to humans may vary considerably. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.relation.uri http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1567134816303550
dc.rights © 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Blastocystis en
dc.subject Parasite en
dc.subject Microbial eukaryote en
dc.subject Microbial survey en
dc.subject Prevalence en
dc.subject Gut microbe en
dc.subject Microbial diversity en
dc.subject Human-human transmission en
dc.title Prevalence and genetic diversity of Blastocystis in family units living in the United States en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Pauline Scanlan, Alimentary Pharmabotic Centre (Apc), University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: p.scanlan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this article is restricted until 12 months after publication by the request of the publisher. en
dc.check.date 2017-08-18
dc.date.updated 2016-11-23T10:22:35Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 372982667
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Infection Genetics And Evolution en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress P.Scanlan@ucc.ie en


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© 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license
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