Lost in translation? The potential psychobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) fails to modulate stress or cognitive performance in healthy male subjects

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dc.contributor.author Kelly, John R.
dc.contributor.author Allen, Andrew P.
dc.contributor.author Temko, Andriy
dc.contributor.author Hutch, William
dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Paul J.
dc.contributor.author Farid, Niloufar
dc.contributor.author Murphy, Eileen F.
dc.contributor.author Boylan, Geraldine B.
dc.contributor.author Bienenstock, John
dc.contributor.author Cryan, John F.
dc.contributor.author Clarke, Gerard
dc.contributor.author Dinan, Timothy G.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-11-28T16:00:26Z
dc.date.available 2016-11-28T16:00:26Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-16
dc.identifier.citation Kelly, J. R., Allen, A. P., Temko, A., Hutch, W., Kennedy, P. J., Farid, N., Murphy, E., Boylan, G., Bienenstock, J., Cryan, J. F., Clarke, G. and Dinan, T. G. (2017) 'Lost in translation? The potential psychobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) fails to modulate stress or cognitive performance in healthy male subjects', Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 61, pp. 50-59. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.11.018 en
dc.identifier.volume 61
dc.identifier.startpage 50
dc.identifier.endpage 59
dc.identifier.issn 0889-1591
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3316
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.11.018
dc.description.abstract Background: Preclinical studies have identified certain probiotics as psychobiotics a live microorganisms with a potential mental health benefit. Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) has been shown to reduce stress-related behaviour, corticosterone release and alter central expression of GABA receptors in an anxious mouse strain. However, it is unclear if this single putative psychobiotic strain has psychotropic activity in humans. Consequently, we aimed to examine if these promising preclinical findings could be translated to healthy human volunteers. Objectives: To determine the impact of L. rhamnosus on stress-related behaviours, physiology, inflammatory response, cognitive performance and brain activity patterns in healthy male participants. An 8 week, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design was employed. Twenty-nine healthy male volunteers participated. Participants completed self-report stress measures, cognitive assessments and resting electroencephalography (EEG). Plasma IL10, IL1β, IL6, IL8 and TNFα levels and whole blood Toll-like 4 (TLR-4) agonist-induced cytokine release were determined by multiplex ELISA. Salivary cortisol was determined by ELISA and subjective stress measures were assessed before, during and after a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT). Results: There was no overall effect of probiotic treatment on measures of mood, anxiety, stress or sleep quality and no significant effect of probiotic over placebo on subjective stress measures, or the HPA response to the SECPT. Visuospatial memory performance, attention switching, rapid visual information processing, emotion recognition and associated EEG measures did not show improvement over placebo. No significant anti-inflammatory effects were seen as assessed by basal and stimulated cytokine levels. Conclusions: L. rhamnosus was not superior to placebo in modifying stress-related measures, HPA response, inflammation or cognitive performance in healthy male participants. These findings highlight the challenges associated with moving promising preclinical studies, conducted in an anxious mouse strain, to healthy human participants. Future interventional studies investigating the effect of this psychobiotic in populations with stress-related disorders are required. en
dc.description.sponsorship Science Foundation Ireland (SFI Grant Number SFI/12/RC/2273); Health Research Board (HRB Health Research Awards (grant nos. HRA_POR/2011/23; HRA_POR/2012/32; HRA-POR-2-14-647); European Commission (EU GRANT 613979 (MYNEWGUT FP7-KBBE-2013-7); Brain and Behaviour Research Foundation, United States (NARSAD Young Investigator Grant Number 20771). en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.rights © 2016, Elsevier Inc. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ en
dc.subject Psychobiotic en
dc.subject Brain-gut axis en
dc.subject Stress en
dc.subject Cognition en
dc.subject Memory en
dc.subject EEG en
dc.title Lost in translation? The potential psychobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) fails to modulate stress or cognitive performance in healthy male subjects en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Ted Dinan, Psychiatry, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: t.dinan@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.check.info Access to this item is restricted until 12 months after publication by the request of the publisher en
dc.check.date 2017-11-16
dc.date.updated 2016-11-28T15:43:46Z
dc.description.version Accepted Version en
dc.internal.rssid 373618764
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Health Research Board en
dc.contributor.funder European Commission en
dc.contributor.funder Seventh Framework Programme en
dc.contributor.funder Brain and Behaviour Research Foundation, United States en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Brain, Behavior, And Immunity en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress t.dinan@ucc.ie en
dc.relation.project info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7::SP1::KBBE/613979/EU/Microbiome Influence on Energy balance and Brain Development-Function Put into Action to Tackle Diet-related Diseases and Behavior./MYNEWGUT en


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© 2016, Elsevier Inc. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, Elsevier Inc. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
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