Hazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study

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dc.contributor.author Davoren, Martin P.
dc.contributor.author Shiely, Frances
dc.contributor.author Byrne, Michael
dc.contributor.author Perry, Ivan J.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-01T12:32:40Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-01T12:32:40Z
dc.date.issued 2015-01-29
dc.identifier.citation Davoren, M. P., Shiely, F., Byrne, M. and Perry, I. J. (2015) 'Hazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study'. BMJ Open, 5: e006045 (8pp). doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006045 en
dc.identifier.volume 5 en
dc.identifier.startpage e006045-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage e006045-8 en
dc.identifier.issn 2044-6055,
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3337
dc.identifier.doi 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006045
dc.description.abstract Objective: There is considerable evidence of a cultural shift towards heavier alcohol consumption among university students, especially women. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and correlates of hazardous alcohol consumption (HAC) among university students with particular reference to gender and to compare different modes of data collection in this population. Setting: A large Irish university. Design: A cross-sectional study using a classroom distributed paper questionnaire. Participants: A total of 2275 undergraduates completed the classroom survey, 84% of those in class and 51% of those registered for the relevant module. Main outcome measures: Prevalence of HAC measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Consumption (AUDIT-C) and the proportion of university students reporting 1 or more of 13 adverse consequences linked to HAC. HAC was defined as an AUDIT-C score of 6 or more among males and 5 or more among females. Results: In the classroom sample, 66.4% (95% CI 64.4 to 68.3) reported HAC (65.2% men and 67.3% women). In women, 57.4% met HAC thresholds for men. Similar patterns of adverse consequences were observed among men and women. Students with a hazardous consumption pattern were more likely to report smoking, illicit drug use and being sexually active. Conclusions: The findings highlight the high prevalence of HAC among university students relative to the general population. Public policy measures require review to tackle the short-term and long-term risks to physical, mental and social health and well-being. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher BMJ Publishing Group en
dc.rights © 2015, The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.subject Alcohol consumption en
dc.subject University students en
dc.subject Women en
dc.subject Ireland en
dc.subject Hazardous alcohol consumption (HAC) en
dc.subject Public health en
dc.title Hazardous alcohol consumption among university students in Ireland: a cross-sectional study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Martin Davoren, Student Health Services, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: m.davoren@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2016-12-01T12:25:24Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 338590377
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle BMJ Open en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress m.davoren@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress f.shiely@ucc.ie en


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© 2015, The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2015, The Authors. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
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