Parents' concerns about future pregnancy after stillbirth: a qualitative study

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dc.contributor.author Meaney, Sarah
dc.contributor.author Everard, Claire M.
dc.contributor.author Gallagher, Stephen
dc.contributor.author O'Donoghue, Keelin
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-07T12:50:36Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-07T12:50:36Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07
dc.identifier.citation Meaney, S., Everard, C. M., Gallagher, S. and O'Donoghue, K. (2016) 'Parents' concerns about future pregnancy after stillbirth: a qualitative study', Health Expectations, 20(4), pp. 555-562. doi:10.1111/hex.12480 en
dc.identifier.volume 20
dc.identifier.issued 4
dc.identifier.startpage 555
dc.identifier.endpage 562
dc.identifier.issn 1369-7625
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3355
dc.identifier.doi 10.1111/hex.12480
dc.description.abstract Objectives: As stillbirth has a devastating impact, it is imperative to understand the importance of clinical and emotional care after stillbirth and how it influences subsequent pregnancies. The aim of the study was to gain insight into the consideration and planning of a subsequent pregnancy by parents in the weeks following stillbirth. Design: A qualitative semi-structured interview format was utilized. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was employed as the analytic strategy. Participants and setting: The recruitment strategy focused on couples whereby the parents of ten stillborn babies were contacted; however, five men declined to participate in the study. The final sample of 15 parents were all Irish: ten of whom were female and five of whom were male. Results: Findings revealed two superordinate themes relating to a subsequent pregnancy after stillbirth: aspirations for future pregnancy and expectations of future care. Parents disclosed how the prospect of a subsequent pregnancy was daunting with fears about the potential loss of another child. Despite these fears, parentsâ aspirations differed in the days following stillbirth; mothers wished to plan a future pregnancy while fathers were reluctant to consider any pregnancies. Parents were unsure of what to expect in terms of the level of care that would be provided to them in a subsequent pregnancy. Additional appointments at the maternity hospital were considered crucial to provide reassurance during a subsequent pregnancy. Conclusions: These findings underscore the far-reaching and contrasting effects of stillbirth on parents. These complex needs highlight the importance of the multidisciplinary team approach.Objectives: As stillbirth has a devastating impact, it is imperative to understand the importance of clinical and emotional care after stillbirth and how it influences subsequent pregnancies. The aim of the study was to gain insight into the consideration and planning of a subsequent pregnancy by parents in the weeks following stillbirth. Design: A qualitative semi-structured interview format was utilized. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was employed as the analytic strategy. Participants and setting: The recruitment strategy focused on couples whereby the parents of ten stillborn babies were contacted; however, five men declined to participate in the study. The final sample of 15 parents were all Irish: ten of whom were female and five of whom were male. Results: Findings revealed two superordinate themes relating to a subsequent pregnancy after stillbirth: aspirations for future pregnancy and expectations of future care. Parents disclosed how the prospect of a subsequent pregnancy was daunting with fears about the potential loss of another child. Despite these fears, parentsâ aspirations differed in the days following stillbirth; mothers wished to plan a future pregnancy while fathers were reluctant to consider any pregnancies. Parents were unsure of what to expect in terms of the level of care that would be provided to them in a subsequent pregnancy. Additional appointments at the maternity hospital were considered crucial to provide reassurance during a subsequent pregnancy. Conclusions: These findings underscore the far-reaching and contrasting effects of stillbirth on parents. These complex needs highlight the importance of the multidisciplinary team approach. en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd. en
dc.rights © 2016, the Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Fathers en
dc.subject Mothers en
dc.subject Qualitative en
dc.subject Stillbirth en
dc.subject Subsequent pregnancy en
dc.title Parents' concerns about future pregnancy after stillbirth: a qualitative study en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Sarah Meaney, Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: s.meaney@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2016-12-07T12:39:00Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 374764878
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Health Expectations en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress s.meaney@ucc.ie en


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© 2016, the Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, the Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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