Insights into the mechanisms of eukaryotic translation gained with ribosome profiling

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dc.contributor.author Andreev, Dmitry E.
dc.contributor.author O'Connor, Patrick B. F.
dc.contributor.author Loughran, Gary
dc.contributor.author Dmitriev, Sergey E.
dc.contributor.author Baranov, Pavel V.
dc.contributor.author Shatsky, Ivan N.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-04T09:17:57Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-04T09:17:57Z
dc.date.issued 2016-12-06
dc.identifier.citation Andreev, D.E., O'Connor, P.B.F., Loughran, G., Dmitriev, S.E., Baranov, P.V. and Shatsky, I.N. (2016) ‘Insights into the mechanisms of eukaryotic translation gained with ribosome profiling’, Nucleic Acids Research. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkw1190 en
dc.identifier.issn 0305-1048
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3416
dc.identifier.doi 10.1093/nar/gkw1190
dc.description.abstract The development of Ribosome Profiling (RiboSeq) has revolutionized functional genomics. RiboSeq is based on capturing and sequencing of the mRNA fragments enclosed within the translating ribosome and it thereby provides a â snapshotâ of ribosome positions at the transcriptome wide level. Although the method is predominantly used for analysis of differential gene expression and discovery of novel translated ORFs, the RiboSeq data can also be a rich source of information about molecular mechanisms of polypeptide synthesis and translational control. This review will focus on how recent findings made with RiboSeq have revealed important details of the molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes. These include mRNA translation sensitivity to drugs affecting translation initiation and elongation, the roles of upstream ORFs in response to stress, the dynamics of elongation and termination as well as details of intrinsic ribosome behavior on the mRNA after translation termination. As the RiboSeq method is still at a relatively early stage we will also discuss the implications of RiboSeq artifacts on data interpretation. en
dc.description.sponsorship Russian Science Foundation (Grant Numbers 14-14-00127 and RBFR 14-04-00412); Science Foundation Ireland (Grant Number 12/IA/1335) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research en
dc.rights © 2016, the Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ en
dc.subject Functional genomics en
dc.subject Polypeptide synthesis en
dc.subject Elongation en
dc.subject Termination en
dc.subject Ribosome profiling en
dc.title Insights into the mechanisms of eukaryotic translation gained with ribosome profiling en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Pavel Baranov, School Of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: p.baranov@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-01-03T13:18:41Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 378200378
dc.contributor.funder Russian Science Foundation en
dc.contributor.funder Science Foundation Ireland en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Nucleic Acids Research en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked Yes en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress p.baranov@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.bibliocheck Add vol./issue/page range. Amend citation accordingly.


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© 2016, the Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016, the Authors. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
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