Impact of exercise on innate immunity in multiple sclerosis progression and symptomatology

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Barry, Alison
dc.contributor.author Cronin, Owen
dc.contributor.author Ryan, Aisling M.
dc.contributor.author Sweeney, Brian
dc.contributor.author Yap, Siew M.
dc.contributor.author O'Toole, Orna
dc.contributor.author Allen, Andrew P.
dc.contributor.author Clarke, Gerard
dc.contributor.author O'Halloran, Ken D.
dc.contributor.author Downer, Eric J.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-05T10:03:53Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-05T10:03:53Z
dc.date.issued 2016-06-02
dc.identifier.citation Barry, A., Cronin, O., Ryan, A. M., Sweeney, B., Yap, S. M., O'Toole, O., Allen, A. P., Clarke, G., O'Halloran, K. D. and Downer, E. J. (2016) 'Impact of Exercise on Innate Immunity in Multiple Sclerosis Progression and Symptomatology', Frontiers in Physiology, 7,194 (13 pp). doi:10.3389/fphys.2016.00194 en
dc.identifier.volume 7 en
dc.identifier.startpage 194-1 en
dc.identifier.endpage 194-13 en
dc.identifier.issn 1664-042X
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3429
dc.identifier.doi 10.3389/fphys.2016.00194
dc.description.abstract Multiple Sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic progressive immune-mediated neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), is characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammatory demyelination and consequent axonal deterioration. It accounts for functional deterioration and lasting disability among young adults. A body of literature demonstrates that physical activity counteracts fatigue and depression and may improve overall quality of life in MS patients. Furthermore, much data indicates that exercise ameliorates chronic neuroinflammation and its related pathologies by tipping cytokine profiles toward an anti-inflammatory signature. Recent data has focused on the direct impact of exercise training on the innate immune system by targeting toll-like receptors (TLRs), signaling pattern recognition receptors that govern the innate immune response, shedding light on the physiological role of TLRs in health and disease. Indeed, TLRs continue to emerge as players in the neuroinflammatory processes underpinning MS. This review will highlight evidence that physical activity and exercise are potential immunomodulatory therapies, targeting innate signaling mechanism(s) to modulate MS symptom development and progression. en
dc.description.sponsorship University College Cork (Physiological Society, Department of Physiology); Trinity College Dublin (Department of Physiology) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Frontiers Media en
dc.rights © 2016 Barry, Cronin, Ryan, Sweeney, Yap, O'Toole, Allen, Clarke, O'Halloran and Downer. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. en
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Multiple Sclerosis en
dc.subject Exercise en
dc.subject Neuroinflammation en
dc.subject Innate immunity en
dc.subject TLRs en
dc.subject Cytokines en
dc.title Impact of exercise on innate immunity in multiple sclerosis progression and symptomatology en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Ken O'Halloran, Physiology, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: k.ohalloran@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-01-05T09:56:08Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 343933848
dc.contributor.funder University College Cork en
dc.contributor.funder Trinity College Dublin en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Frontiers in Physiology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress k.odonoghue@ucc.ie en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© 2016 Barry, Cronin, Ryan, Sweeney, Yap, O'Toole, Allen, Clarke, O'Halloran and Downer. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 Barry, Cronin, Ryan, Sweeney, Yap, O'Toole, Allen, Clarke, O'Halloran and Downer. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
This website uses cookies. By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies in accordance with the UCC Privacy and Cookies Statement. For more information about cookies and how you can disable them, visit our Privacy and Cookies statement