Skin microbiome before development of atopic dermatitis: Early colonization with commensal staphylococci at 2 months is associated with a lower risk of atopic dermatitis at 1 year

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dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Elizabeth A.
dc.contributor.author Connolly, Jennifer
dc.contributor.author Hourihane, Jonathan O'B.
dc.contributor.author Fallon, Padraic G.
dc.contributor.author McLean, W. H. Irwin
dc.contributor.author Murray, Deirdre M.
dc.contributor.author Jo, Jay-Hyun
dc.contributor.author Segre, Julia A.
dc.contributor.author Kong, Heidi H.
dc.contributor.author Irvine, Alan D.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-01-06T16:19:39Z
dc.date.available 2017-01-06T16:19:39Z
dc.date.issued 2016-09-05
dc.identifier.citation Kennedy, E. A., Connolly, J., Hourihane, J. O. B., Fallon, P. G., McLean, W. H. I., Murray, D., Jo, J.-H., Segre, J. A., Kong, H. H. and Irvine, A. D. (2017) 'Skin microbiome before development of atopic dermatitis: Early colonization with commensal staphylococci at 2 months is associated with a lower risk of atopic dermatitis at 1 year', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 139(1), pp. 166-172. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2016.07.029 en
dc.identifier.volume 139 en
dc.identifier.issued 1 en
dc.identifier.startpage 166 en
dc.identifier.endpage 172 en
dc.identifier.issn 0091-6749
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10468/3445
dc.identifier.doi 10.1016/j.jaci.2016.07.029
dc.description.abstract Background: Disease flares of established atopic dermatitis (AD) are generally associated with a low-diversity skin microbiota and Staphylococcus aureus dominance. The temporal transition of the skin microbiome between early infancy and the dysbiosis of established AD is unknown. Methods: We randomly selected 50 children from the Cork Babies After SCOPE: Evaluating the Longitudinal Impact Using Neurological and Nutritional Endpoints (BASELINE) longitudinal birth cohort for microbiome sampling at 3 points in the first 6 months of life at 4 skin sites relevant to AD: the antecubital and popliteal fossae, nasal tip, and cheek. We identified 10 infants with AD and compared them with 10 randomly selected control infants with no AD. We performed bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing and analysis directly from clinical samples. Results: Bacterial community structures and diversity shifted over time, suggesting that age strongly affects the skin microbiome in infants. Unlike established AD, these patients with infantile AD did not have noticeably dysbiotic communities before or with disease and were not colonized by S aureus. In comparing patients and control subjects, infants who had affected skin at month 12 had statistically significant differences in bacterial communities on the antecubital fossa at month 2 compared with infants who were unaffected at month 12. In particular, commensal staphylococci were significantly less abundant in infants affected at month 12, suggesting that this genus might protect against the later development of AD. Conclusions: This study suggests that 12-month-old infants with AD were not colonized with S aureus before having AD. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether colonization with commensal staphylococci modulates skin immunity and attenuates development of AD. en
dc.description.sponsorship Ministry of Health and Welfare, South Korea (Korean Health Technology R&D Project, HI15C1095)) en
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier en
dc.rights © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ en
dc.subject Staphylococcus aureus en
dc.subject Atopic dermatitis en
dc.subject Skin en
dc.subject Microbiome en
dc.subject Longitudinal birth cohort en
dc.subject 16S sequencing en
dc.title Skin microbiome before development of atopic dermatitis: Early colonization with commensal staphylococci at 2 months is associated with a lower risk of atopic dermatitis at 1 year en
dc.type Article (peer-reviewed) en
dc.internal.authorcontactother Jonathan Hourihane, Paediatrics & Child Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. +353-21-490-3000 Email: j.hourihane@ucc.ie en
dc.internal.availability Full text available en
dc.date.updated 2017-01-06T16:01:32Z
dc.description.version Published Version en
dc.internal.rssid 378582581
dc.contributor.funder Wellcome Trust en
dc.contributor.funder National Human Genome Research Institute en
dc.contributor.funder National Institutes of Health en
dc.contributor.funder National Cancer Institute en
dc.contributor.funder Food Standards Agency en
dc.contributor.funder National Children’s Research Centre, Ireland en
dc.contributor.funder Ministry of Health and Welfare, South Korea en
dc.description.status Peer reviewed en
dc.identifier.journaltitle Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology en
dc.internal.copyrightchecked No !!CORA!! en
dc.internal.licenseacceptance Yes en
dc.internal.IRISemailaddress j.hourihane@ucc.ie en


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© 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
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